Category : Exhibits

thumbnail Jan 11

Tomás Esson: The GOAT at Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami

Until May 2, 2021

Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami

61 NE 41st Street
Miami, FL 33137

Cuban artist Tomás Esson exhibits works from the last thirty years.

“Tomás Esson: The GOAT” is the first solo museum presentation for Cuban painter Tomás Esson. On this occasion, ICA Miami brings together works spanning his thirty-year studio practice alongside a site-specific mural and a commissioned reinterpretation of his early painting installations.

From his very first exhibition in Havana in 1988, which was censored and closed by Cuban authorities, Esson has created lively and grotesque paintings loaded with dynamic energy, mythological references, and political commentary. The presentation will include early works, as well as painting from Esson’s “Retrato” (Portraits) series and his “Wet Paintings” series. Each of these three bodies of works began in one of the different cities where Esson has lived and worked—the early paintings in Havana, the “Retratos” in Miami, and the “Wet Paintings” in New York City.

For more information check out: https://icamiami.org/exhibition/tomas-esson/

Tomás Esson at CANY blog

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thumbnail Jan 7

María Magdalena Campos in Group Show ALIEN NATIONS 2020 at Coral Gables Museum

Carole A. Fewell Gallery

December 1st, 2020 – March 14th, 2021

Cuban Artist María Magdalena Campos is part of the group show ALIEN NATIONS 2020 at the Coral Gables Museum in Miami.

Alien Nations 2020 gathers a group of artists who convey different forms of alienation. It looks at a myriad of issues that are affecting the psychological state of the individual and the different groups within which we live.

Nearly two dozen creatives, both emerging and established, many with connections to South Florida, exhibit works in a broad range of media – painting, photography, sculpture, installation, video, and performance documentation. Inscribed in a long tradition of responses to troubled times, these pieces not only portray the current socio-political and economic landscape, but also share sensitive insights into the direction of our humanity, and hope for the future.

Events:

January 9 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Artist Panel: Alien Nations

To RSVP for the panel: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcsc-mqrz0oHdL1ZVt3QpNfuva_RbEuSMUB

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the conversation.

María Magdalena Campos at CANY BLOG

María Magdalena Campos online

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thumbnail Dec 31

“Artivism” in Today’s Cuba for Free Expression

Now is the time more than ever to support Cuban artists.  Many Cubans have fled the island because of political oppression. Many more have left for economic reasons.  A few have escaped due to artistic limitations on their freedom of expression. In fact, at the moment on the island, there is a whole community of artists who are protesting for freedom of expresion.  On November 27, 2020, over 300 artists and their supporters protested in front of the Ministry of Cuba.  

Artist and Writer Coco Fusco journaled the event for the Museum of Modern Art in New York.  For her article “The Right to Have Rights,” she interviewed a series of artists: Camila Lobón, Julio Llópiz Casal, Luis Manuel Otero Alacantra, and Reynier Leyva Novo.

They call the new “artivist” movement 27N. It is a reaction to police brutality towards The San Isidro Movement, a group of artists staging a hunger strike against the arrest of a rapper. 
The event on the 27th was unprecedented because thirty of the protestors were allowed inside to speak with political leaders.  “I personally had never experienced such a democratic event in Cuba before,” said Julio Llópiz Casal.

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thumbnail Dec 28

Weaving a Familial History in Cuban-American Piñatas

Multidisciplinary artist Elizabeth Mesa-Gaido is currently participating in  A Common Thread: Textiles Past & Present. She expresses themes related to her experience as a Cuban exile in her work.  In Cuban-American Piñatas, she wove together colorful fabrics into suitcase-shaped piñatas. They represent her journey back to her homeland. Like many other Cuban-Americans, she visited the island with her family. They carried suitcases packed with goods and supplies to distribute to those in need. 

The piñata suitcases allude to the concept of redistribution of goods, which is the basis of communism. Even though pinatas are typically Mexican, the artist uses them to highlight a communal activity. Each person picks a ribbon and grabs the shared goods within. “It’s ironic because we think of communism as a group activity, and yet for many, it hasn’t worked out so well when commodities cannot be distributed to everybody that needs them,” expressed Mesa-Gaido. 

Her Cuban-American Piñatas and other works are currently part of  A Common Thread: Textiles Past & Present.  The exhibit showcases contemporary innovations in textile art. It will be on display through Jan. 9, 2021 at The Art Center of Greenwood in South Carolina. 

She is currently Professor of Art at Morehead State University.

Check out more articles about Mesa-Gaido from the CANY blog!

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thumbnail Dec 12

Panel discussion “Ninguna mujer es una isla: ocho artistas en CANY”

Panel discussion in conjunction with our current exhibition, Fall for Her

Tuesday, December 15 2020 4 pm EST (GMT -5) ****This panel is in Spanish.****

Via Facebook Live: Click here

Participants:

Suset Sánchez, María Lourdes Mariño, Janet Batet, Meyken Barreto, Tanya Álvarez (moderadora)

CANY online exhibit FALL FOR HER

CANY Online Gallery

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thumbnail Dec 8

Miami Art Week: Faena Art Features Cuban-born Artist

“Now is no time to think of what you do not have. Think of what you can do with what there is,” is a passage easily applicable to today’s time. Cuban-born artist Alexandre Arrechea took it directly from the text of Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea. The novel is the literary inspiration for his latest installation Dreaming with Lions. Faena Art will present it on the beach until December 6.

The colossal installation was assembled in front of the Faena Hotel on Miami Beach during Miami Art Week. It is an existential work with many symbols. Measuring a 62’ diameter, the work resembles a giant forum-style library.  Arrechea also incorporated beach towels with illustrated phrases, like the one above, from the novel.      

Through the artwork, the artist seeks to express the sheer force of the human spirit during these perilous times.  He reconstructs the ideals of hope, faith and strength of the human spirit prevail in the face of the moral challenges.  The library style of the work further enhances the ideological constructs. 

“Dreaming with Lions” proposes action and reflection. That we reflect upon coherence and respect of oneself and others, and that we continue to invent ways to confront our destiny while maintaining integrity and grandeur,” expressed the artist. 

Arrechea was born in Trinidad, Cuba in 1970, and he currently lives in Miami, FL.  He graduated from the Instituto Superior de Arte (ISA) of Havana in 1994.

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thumbnail Dec 8

Miami Businessman Promotes Cuban Art with Fine Arts on the Plate

Fine Arts on the Plate is the current exhibition of Cuban art displayed at the Kendall Art Center (KAC).  Forty-five artists of Cuban origin who live outside of the island have participated in the show. KAC will display the plate art at their showroom in South West Miami until February 2021. 

The founder Leonardo Rodriguez conceived of the idea to have artists paint on original plates instead of large canvases as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.  He wanted to not only bring back the forgotten art of ceramics but also provide a financial opportunity for artists.  “Not everyone has 8 or 10 thousand dollars to buy a canvas, but anyone has one thousand or one thousand two hundred dollars to pay for a plate,” he explained to Alona Martinez of the Miami Herald. 

Originally from Cuba, Rodriguez founded the art center because he wanted to promote Cuban artists working outside the island. He is committed to helping artists who are exiled from Cuba. “The Cuban artist, when he leaves Cuba, is forgotten…I wanted to show the world that the artist that is in Miami keeps being a Cuban artist and is very professional,” he mentioned to the Herald. Even though most of the artists that KAC exhibits are from Miami, they have also displayed the art of Cuban artists living in Japan, Spain, and Boston.  

The Kendall Art Center is a non-profit organization, which opened to the public in the summer of 2016. Rodriguez created the gallery accidentally in order to house his vast collection of Cuban art. He began collecting pieces as a young adult in Cuba. His mother worked at the renowned Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes. As a young child, he garnered a love for art. He had access to one of Cuba’s most extensive art collections.  He needed a space to store all of the art overflowing in his home. It was more of an experiment to the business owner, who was unsure if anyone would visit the center. To his surprise, about 200 people attended the private collection.  Now, about 20,000 people visit the KAC yearly.  With over 600 pieces, his private art collection is one of the largest collections of contemporary Cuban art in Miami.

Link:—> Wikipedia

Link:—> KAC web page

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thumbnail Dec 3

Cuban-American artist ERNESTO BRIEL exhibit’s IRIDESCENT GEOMETRIES at Juan Carlos Maldonado Art Collection

DATE: Thursday, November 19, 2020 –
Saturday, March 20, 2021

TIME: Tuesdays to Fridays 10:30 am – 5 pm, Saturdays: 11am – 4pm

PLACE: Juan Carlos Maldonado Art Collection

The Juan Carlos Maldonado Art Collection presents our new exhibition of cuban artist Ernesto Briel: Iridescent Geometries. 

Since its inception in 2005, the driving force behind the Juan Carlos Maldonado Art Collection, JCMAC, has been to recognize and generate awareness on the contribution that Geometric Abstraction has made to art history in the twentieth century. With the title Iridescent Geometries, JCMAC gives continuity to the exhibition project that began six years ago.

Since then, its objective has been to promote the study of modern and contemporary art at an international level, with an emphasis on abstract-geometric practices. On this occasion, and after having exhibited part of the collection, he focuses his attention on the work of Ernesto Briel, a Cuban optical artist whose production is practically unknown, even among specialists in Latin American art.

Ernesto Briel at Sotheby’s, by Gustavo Valdés

Ernesto Briel at CANY Blog

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thumbnail Nov 25

FOCUS: exhibit by Cuban-American Photographer Mario Algaze

November 3 – December 31, 2020

Mario Algaze is a contemporary Cuban-American photographer whose work celebrates the culture of Latin America.

In 1960, at the age of thirteen, Algaze was exiled from Cuba with his family. He relocated to America and settled in Miami, Florida. Miami offered a rich cultural mecca that encouraged Algaze to travel throughout Central and South America. These trips allowed him a glimpse of belonging within a familiar culture.

In finding his identity after exile, he began photographing Latin America in the 1970’s while reconnecting with the feeling of home. His photographs embody the everyday of Latin life. Between his travels in the late 70’s, Algaze studied visual art at Miami Dade College. Algaze’s masterful command of light illuminates his street scenes that detail the struggles and victories of Latin culture.

Mario Algaze is the recipient of various acclaimed awards, including the Florida Artist Fellowship from the Florida Arts Council (1985), the Cintas Foundation Fellowship in Photography (1991), the Visual Arts Fellowship and the SAF Artist Fellowship sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts. In 1992, he received the National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Photography.

Mario Algaze at Wikipedia

Mario Algaze at CANY Blog

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thumbnail Nov 7

Cuban-American Master Embraces the Chaos of Covid

Cuban-American master Luis Cruz Azaceta has created five new pieces during the lockdown of 2020. The artist transmuted the chaos of the pandemic into his artistic vision. He addresses the “poetic window of the virus and its state of mutation; a cacophony of horror and beauty” in his Pandemia paintings.

“Luis Cruz Azaceta: Personal Velocity in the Age of Covid,” will be on display at the Lyle O. Reitzel Gallery in Santo Domingo from Nov. 26th, 2020 to Jan. 30th, 2021. In addition to the new pandemic pieces, the exhibit will include six retrospective pieces, which he produced from 2007-2019. All the pieces in the show are all connected through the artist’s iconography.

Born in Havana in 1942, Azaceta left the island in 1960 when he was a teenager . He immigrated to New York, where he graduated from The School of Visual Arts. Throughout his 40-plus year career, his works have reflected social issues including the AIDS crisis, the war in Iraq, and the migration of Cuban rafters.

His work has been displayed nationally and internationally, and he has won numerous awards from some of the most prestigious institutions.

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