Category : Articles

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FOCUS

November 3 – December 31, 2020

MARIO ALGAZE

Mario Algaze is a contemporary Cuban-American photographer whose work celebrates the culture of Latin America.

In 1960, at the age of thirteen, Algaze was exiled from Cuba with his family. He relocated to America and settled in Miami, Florida. Miami offered a rich cultural mecca that encouraged Algaze to travel throughout Central and South America. These trips allowed him a glimpse of belonging within a familiar culture.

In finding his identity after exile, he began photographing Latin America in the 1970’s while reconnecting with the feeling of home. His photographs embody the everyday of Latin life. Between his travels in the late 70’s, Algaze studied visual art at Miami Dade College. Algaze’s masterful command of light illuminates his street scenes that detail the struggles and victories of Latin culture.

Mario Algaze is the recipient of various acclaimed awards, including the Florida Artist Fellowship from the Florida Arts Council (1985), the Cintas Foundation Fellowship in Photography (1991), the Visual Arts Fellowship and the SAF Artist Fellowship sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts. In 1992, he received the National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Photography.

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thumbnail Nov 22

105-Year-Old Artist Carmen Herrera Has a New Mural in East Harlem

Carmen Herrera, the 105-year-old Cuban American abstract painter, has a new mural in East Harlem. Uno, Dos, Tres just went up on the walls of the Manhattan East Academy, a school on E. 100th Street. Painted by students from across the city, through a partnership with the arts and education nonprofit Publicolor, it’s a mesmerizing black-and-white optical pattern that’s two stories tall, and visible from the FDR.

When Herrera was approached to do the installation, what excited her the most wasn’t the mural itself; it was that students would be painting it. The students were supposed to paint the piece ahead of her birthday in May, but the coronavirus pandemic delayed the process. It took the students ten weeks to complete the mural, which is composed of 96 separate boards that were assembled on site.

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thumbnail Jun 18

Zilia Sánchez at Galerie Lelong, New York – Interview

From ocula.com

April – June, 2016

In the 1950s, on a Havana rooftop and reeling from the recent passing of her father, Cuban artist Zilia Sánchez (b. 1926) had an epiphany. A gust of wind blew a hanging laundry sheet (the very one her father had been lying on when he died) against a pipe and a wall, and in its resulting form she discovered an entirely new approach to her work. She abandoned painting on flat surfaces and began pulling canvas tautly over oddly-shaped wooden armatures, creating curved peaks that opened painting up from its conventionally rectangular state. Introducing three-dimensional forms to her work, Sánchez’s shift challenged the preferred frontal view of artworks by interrupting the face-on gaze and coercing it around corners.

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thumbnail May 29

Teresita Fernández Lights a Fire in the West

By Alanna Martinez

From Observer.com

Teresita Fernández knows how to light up a room, and she’s done just that inside the front gallery of Anthony Meier Fine Arts in San Francisco. The century-old house inside which Mr. Meier’s gallery is located has been set ablaze by Ms. Fernández’s fiery handiwork, which features a smoky landscape rendered in charcoal and a glittering inferno made from thousands of glazed ceramic tiles.

Ms. Fernández is widely known for her large-scale experiential installations, the most recent being a 500-foot mirrored canopy for New York’s Madison Square Park which was experienced by nearly 50,000 people each day during its nine-month run.

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thumbnail Mar 27

Jorge Rodríguez Gerada: How One Artist Has Changed the Face of Barcelona

From Crane.tv

Urban painter, sculptor and creator of monumental land art, Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada is an artist working against the divisive forces that are pulling contemporary society apart.  His most recent mural in Barcelona, called “Panorama”, is a composite portrait that combines features from 10 women in the city’s Sant Martí neighbourhood. The result, an “everywoman”, represents and celebrates the contributions of women to community life.

 

The huge mural – painted on a wall 33 feet across and more than 90 feet high – was part of the Open Walls Conference 2015 and is one of his Identity Series, which he started in 2002 when he moved to Barcelona from New York City. The artist started painting murals of anonymous locals not only to question the controls imposed in public space, but to comment on consumer messages by using the the same strategic positioning and size of a billboard to create a counter commentary.

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thumbnail Mar 20

Freedom and Ambiguity: An Interview with Julio Larraz

From Art Fuse

By Graham McLean

With an ease and precision that comes only from a lifelong dedication to one’s craft, it is no wonder why so many consider Cuban born artist Julio Larraz to be one of the most important Latin American artists working today. Larraz creates monumental works of art that are majestic and refined, but still somehow accessible. His works, though painted naturalistically, are often highly imaginative, and this duality is what draws the viewer in.

Larraz has had an impressive career dating back to the 1960s when he drew political caricatures for the New York Times, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, Vogue Magazine, and other publications. He is the recipient of an award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and his work can be found in museums, galleries, and private collections all across the globe. I had the great honor of speaking with Larraz about his work and what he thinks his art means.

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thumbnail Aug 2

Ana Mendieta In ‘Between History And The Body’

From Forbes

7-29-2015

By Ann Binlot, Contributor

Cuban artist Ana Mendieta was a rising artist before she tragically jumped out of a window in her Greenwich Village apartment, falling 33 floors to her death following a fight with her husband, artist Carl André, in 1985. Since then, she has become a cult figure in the art world. A series of six self-portraits shot in 1972, titled “Untitled (Glass on Body Imprints)”, depicts Mendieta in a position that is both vulnerable and powerful as she presses a pane of glass against various body parts, including her butt, breasts and torso.

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thumbnail Jun 5

Teresita Fernández: FATA MORGANA, at Madison Square Park, NYC

From TimeOut New York

Over the past 15 years, artist Teresita Fernández has created more than a dozen public art projects that put the viewer in the role of both spectator and performer. Recalling natural phenomena, her evocative installations, which could be called conceptual landscapes, often rely on optical illusions that become more magical with repeated visits. She talks about her new piece, Fata Morgana, at Madison Square Park, and the earlier works that led to it.

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thumbnail May 5

Pavel Acosta and Juana Valdes, Summer 2015 Guttenberg Arts Residents.

JUANA VALDES

My artwork is a multi-disciplinary practice that combines the process of printmaking, photography, sculpture and ceramic. It integrates the social-political discourse within the art object to analyze relationships between contemporary and historical imagery and their connection to the social, political and economical dominance of the cultures that produce them and their impact on cultural memory.

PAVEL ACOSTA

All my work revolves around stealing. In Cuba, after graduating from the Higher Institute of Art and with little access to unaffordable art materials, I stole dry paint from the crumbling city walls and the objects around me to do collages of recycled paint on paper and canvases. I wanted to survive as an artist in the same way people does in Cuba – smuggling the State resources within the black market as the way to compensate for low salaries and scarcities. I was interested in exploring the boundaries between destroying something, or commiting a crime and creating, as well as the concepts of etics and morality within my society.

Guttenberg Arts is dedicated to promoting the visual arts by providing practicing artists with the space and time to develop their work while engaging with the public. Guttenberg Arts aims to increase opportunities for supported artists by expanding their community through artistic collaborations and promotion to curators and collectors in the tri-state area.

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thumbnail Apr 26

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada sets Terrestrial Interventions from Buenos Aires to San Antonio

Ninna Azzarello
Designboom

Cuban American artist Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada shares his latest works — a series of three portraits set within geographically diverse locations and using various artistic techniques. San Antonio, Texas — Paris, France — and Buenos Aires, Argentina are the home to Rodríguez-Gerada’s new works for his ‘terrestrail series’ and urban mural.

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