Tag : CANY online gallery

thumbnail Feb 10

Martínez Celaya’s ‘A Third Of the Night’ Opens in Aspen

Next week, the Baldwin Gallery in Aspen opens a new show titled A Third of the Night. Cuban-born, LA-based Enrique Martínez Celaya is the artist behind the exhibition. The showcase features twelve of his paintings and one sculpture. It opens this Friday, February 12, 2021 and will be on view until March 14th.

Going to Aspen is like a homecoming for the artist who is a fixture in the Aspen arts scene. He has been involved in the Anderson Ranch Arts Center. He has also had exhibitions at the Baldwin Gallery in the past.

Inspired by the Book of Revelations, A Third of the Night explores the concepts of loss and uncertainty. It also expresses an exilic longing for home. The artists took the name of the show from a passage in the biblical text. It reads “a third of the sun was struck, a third of the moon, and a third of the stars, so that a third of them turned dark. A third of the day was without light, and also a third of the night.” Martinez Celaya found the notion of being without light interesting. “That was interesting to me. The aspect of darkness and what it means when you no longer have light for a period, sort of the mystery and confusion of that.”

Martínez Celaya was born in Palos, Nueva Pas Cuba. His family first relocated to Spain when he was eight. Then, at the age of eleven, the artist’s family moved to Puerto Rico. He graduated from Cornell University in 1982 with a Bachelor of Science in Applied Physics and a minor in Electrical Engineering. Later, he earned a Master’s of Science in Quantum Electronics. He patented several laser devices before he received training in art. In 1994, he graduated with highest honors from the M.F.A. program at the University of California.

Blog links to Enrique Martinez Celaya

Wikipedia link

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thumbnail Feb 8

ART IN WOODEN HEADS

An exhibit by Dorfsman Fine Arts

Art In Wooden Heads is a very unique exhibit presented by Dorfsman Fine Art. It was the brainchild of Silvia Dorfsman, using wooden mannequin heads she asked each of the six artists to create a work. Incredible and awe inspiring works are the result.

The artists are:

  • Jose Bedia
  • Ernesto Capdevilla
  • Liliam Cuenca
  • Ahmed Gomez
  • Noel Morera
  • Carlos Rodríguez Cardenas

CANY Blog posts – Ahmed Gomez

CANY Blog posts – Jose Bedia

CANY Blog posts – Carlos Rodriguez Cardenas

CANY Blog Posts – Liliam Cuenca

Visit CANY Online Gallery

Click on Read more below to see the video.

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thumbnail Feb 7

Aimee Garcia in The Game of Ambiguities

The Black Pony Gallery announced the first solo online exhibition for Cuban-American artist Aimee Garcia. It runs from February 5 to March 1, 2021. Garcia is unique because she utilizes the style of portraiture. She often uses herself as the subject. Using just a few strong colors- red, green, and black- in the backdrop, she draws attention to a person’s facial expressions. She also includes lines in her paintings, adding the sensation of psychological tension.

Garcia describes her work as a game. “I seek to establish a game with the meaning of the materials and the objects…” she states in her artist statement. One can observe from the many lines and spaces a kind of interplay between the dimensions that encourages one to pull in and out of the painting. It also feels like a video game due to the exactness and precision of the intersecting lines. Each space takes you to another level. Each dimension represents a subtext of thought. A particular curve of the eyebrow leads towards layers of hidden meanings.

Garcia also considers her art to be feminine and universal. The artist has claimed to dedicate herself to the “the universal feminine experience.” Her series of paintings titled Repression presents themes of subordination, suffering, and pain. She combined stark grey and black tones with red intersecting lines to express heavy sensations. The look in the eyes of the subject convey a strong emotional message of confinement.

Born in Matanzas, Cuba in 1972, Aimee Garcia currently lives and works in Winston Salem, NC, USA. Garcia graduated from the Higher Institute of Art, Havana, in 1996. Her works are in public collections such as the National Museum of Fine Arts, Havana, Cuba and the Pérez Art Museum of Miami, USA.

Link Cuba Art Database

Work for sale

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thumbnail Jan 16

Agustin Fernandez: Armaduras

ICA Miami invites you to a Zoom presentation on the release of its latest publication on Agustin Fernandez.

Thursday January 21, 2021 at 2 PM


Sign-up here to our Zoom Registration Link

More on Agustin Fernandez from the CANY Blog

Wikipedia link

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thumbnail Jan 4

Guttenburg Arts Presents Winter/Fall Residencies

The Space and Time Artist Residency (STAR) from Guttenburg Arts provides $1,200 stipend to cover materials, travel and lodging for awardees. Gutenberg Arts provides artists with opportunities to create cultural experiences.  

Artists gain access to a professional workspace for the visual arts that includes printmaking, dark room and ceramics facilities. The duration of the residency is three months, and it is located in Guttenberg, New Jersey.  Each participant gains a spot in a group show at the end. In addition, they will spend at least fifteen hours in the studio.  The 4,500 sq. ft. space is open twenty-four hours, seven days a week.  Towards the end of the program, artist give a free public artist lecture or workshop. 

The residency is a prime opportunity in the tri-state area. Successful Artists visit the residents, which gives them a chance to be seen.  After all, in the arts, as in almost everything else, it’s all about who you know.  
The deadline to apply is January 31, 2021. Gutenberg Arts just tweeted on January 1st. “We’ve extended our Open Call for the Fall ’21 & Winter ’22 Space and Time Artist Residency!  Apply at http://guttenbergarts.submittable.com/submit by January 31st!  As always it’s #freetoapply

Link to Guttenberg arts page:–>http://www.guttenbergarts.org

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thumbnail Dec 31

“Artivism” in Today’s Cuba for Free Expression

Now is the time more than ever to support Cuban artists.  Many Cubans have fled the island because of political oppression. Many more have left for economic reasons.  A few have escaped due to artistic limitations on their freedom of expression. In fact, at the moment on the island, there is a whole community of artists who are protesting for freedom of expresion.  On November 27, 2020, over 300 artists and their supporters protested in front of the Ministry of Cuba.  

Artist and Writer Coco Fusco journaled the event for the Museum of Modern Art in New York.  For her article “The Right to Have Rights,” she interviewed a series of artists: Camila Lobón, Julio Llópiz Casal, Luis Manuel Otero Alacantra, and Reynier Leyva Novo.

They call the new “artivist” movement 27N. It is a reaction to police brutality towards The San Isidro Movement, a group of artists staging a hunger strike against the arrest of a rapper. 
The event on the 27th was unprecedented because thirty of the protestors were allowed inside to speak with political leaders.  “I personally had never experienced such a democratic event in Cuba before,” said Julio Llópiz Casal.

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thumbnail Dec 30

Cuba Art NY

Fall online exhibit – Closing event

The icing on the cake… after an incredible online exhibit – the closing event. CANY presents in conjunction with Rialta Magazine – Four Art historians, art curators discuss the 8 women artists included in the CANY online fall show. <<In Spanish>>

Don’t miss it !

Ninguna mujer es una isla: ocho artistas en CANY Conversatorio con la participación de Suset Sánchez, María de Lourdes Mariño, Janet Batet, Meyken Barreto y Tanya Álvarez.

The artists exhibited are:

Kenia Arguiñao

Consuelo Castañeda

Sandra Cordero

Liliam Cuenca

Ana Albertina Delgado

Aimee Garcia

Connie Lloveras

Danay Vigoa

Click Read More below to see Video.

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thumbnail Dec 28

Weaving a Familial History in Cuban-American Piñatas

Multidisciplinary artist Elizabeth Mesa-Gaido is currently participating in  A Common Thread: Textiles Past & Present. She expresses themes related to her experience as a Cuban exile in her work.  In Cuban-American Piñatas, she wove together colorful fabrics into suitcase-shaped piñatas. They represent her journey back to her homeland. Like many other Cuban-Americans, she visited the island with her family. They carried suitcases packed with goods and supplies to distribute to those in need. 

The piñata suitcases allude to the concept of redistribution of goods, which is the basis of communism. Even though pinatas are typically Mexican, the artist uses them to highlight a communal activity. Each person picks a ribbon and grabs the shared goods within. “It’s ironic because we think of communism as a group activity, and yet for many, it hasn’t worked out so well when commodities cannot be distributed to everybody that needs them,” expressed Mesa-Gaido. 

Her Cuban-American Piñatas and other works are currently part of  A Common Thread: Textiles Past & Present.  The exhibit showcases contemporary innovations in textile art. It will be on display through Jan. 9, 2021 at The Art Center of Greenwood in South Carolina. 

She is currently Professor of Art at Morehead State University.

Check out more articles about Mesa-Gaido from the CANY blog!

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thumbnail Dec 24

The DAM Presents a two film installation by Ana Mendieta


The Denver Art Museum presents Suspended Fire, a two film installation from Cuban-born artist Ana Mendieta which will run from December 6, 2020 to March 7, 2021. This work will make you think. It explores the voyage of civilization to understand the concept of light from both a physical standpoint and a metaphorical one. 

Ana Mendieta was born in Cuba in 1948. She died in NYC in 1985. She is best known for using her body as an instrument in her art. In the Silueta Series, she places images of her naked body against various backdrops like space or a fallen tree.

 Wikipedia link

Posts on Ana Mendieta

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thumbnail Dec 23

Open Call for Miami Artists: Locust Projects Gifts in Wavemaker Grants

Attention Miami artists, curators, and collectives! Locust Projects, Miami’s longest running alternative art space, has announced an open call for grants. Information sessions will begin in January 2021 and applications will be due in the Spring. They have awarded $399,000 in arts grants since 2015. During this period, they have gifted up to $6,000 to seventy-seven of Miami’s most visionary artists, curators, and collectives.  

Locust Projects is a local leader in exhibiting innovative works. They take risks outside of traditional art markets and institutions and provide artists with an outlet for experimentation.  Their mission as a non-profit organization includes engaging the local community. They publish, present and produce completed works for view at their location in Miami’s Design District.

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts makes the Wavemaker Grants possible.  They are the first regional regranting program in the southeast. They are part of a national network together with sixteen other Warhol-initiating regranting programs. Awards categories include three groups: Research & Development + Implementation, New Work / Projects, and Long-Haul Projects. 

In 2020, Wavemaker at Locusts awarded $6,000 to four artists in each of the categories. One of the grantees in the area of Long-Haul Projects was Cuban-american artist Sebastian Duncan-Portuondo. In his work Project Exile, he explored the experiences of exiles in the community as marginalized people.    

This year they are allowing grantees affected by COVID-19 to use fifty percent of the funds for supplementary income. Locust Projects encourages artists to adapt their creative vision to concepts explored in light of the pandemic. 

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