Tag : cuban american art

thumbnail May 28

Land Art in the Fields of Spain: “Nourishing Self-Esteem” by Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada

Cuban-American artist Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada is leading a community art project in the fields of
Estopiñán del Castillo, a small town in Aragon, Spain. The massive endeavor includes numerous other artists with experience in the area. The artists utilized the elements of nature to create a striking piece in wheat fields. The palate consists of the green tones of the brushy hillside, the tan hue of soil, and the dark color of neighboring compost. But that is just for the Spring as the art will change along with the seasons. It began in April and ends in October 2021. All together, three phases exist.

This grand project full of inspiration is a tribute to the Fundación Crisálida. It is an initiative in the local area that has allowed nine people with developmental disabilities to develop a sense of self-worth. Together they coexist, baking bread, cakes, cupcakes, croissants, panettones and cookies in a nearby bakery. Then, the delicacies are distributed to the neighboring region. The premise behind the concept is that self-esteem in nourished with community effort. Giving people a chance to provide a benefit to others around them breeds a feeling of importance.

A pair of two hands, one of a child and one of an adult are symbols for the community effort of giving and taking. They represent the power of creation through the work on the land. Our hands are primal tools for breeding and sustaining life through nature. Joined together they make a difference as these artists are doing in the lives of many in the town.

Likewise, the artist stated: “We nourish self-esteem through contact with nature, feeling a sense of gratitude for what the earth gives us, gratitude for the work that sustains us, and pride for what we have completed.”

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thumbnail May 28

Dalton Gata’s First Solo Exhibit “The Way We’ll Be” at Miami’s ICA

The Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) in Miami’s Design District is currently showcasing Cuban-born artist Dalton Gata’s first solo exhibition. The show will be on display until November 21, 2021. “The Way We’ll Be” includes a series of surrealistic installations across mixed media. The media he implemented includes acrylic on canvas and acrylic on linen. He created six large-scale works for the exhibition, and they have not been previously shown anywhere.

The paintings in “The Way We’ll Be” reflect his personal experiences. His deeply personal and striking pieces explore queer culture with the use of mythological symbols.  Some of these images include masks, monsters, and animals such as birds and cats.  Gata’s work is also inspired heavily by his background as an immigrant.  The symbolic landscapes and colorful discrepancies in his surreal pieces reflect the Caribbean island where he was born.

The multidisciplinary artist was born in Santiago de Cuba in 1977. He was trained as a fashion designer but then pursued visual art.  He holds a BFA in Fashion Design from the Altos del Chavón Design School in Santo Domingo.  His flair for style is also visible in his artworks.  With striking colors, mythical creatures, and surreal backdrops the pieces stand out.  Even the characters in the paintings are dressed in stylish garbs. “And now I find myself in the middle of a painting deciding if the character wears a red patent-leather jacket or a shirt made from banana leaves,” described the artist to Lucy Less in a recent article published in Galerie magazine.

The exhibition includes the artist’s first catalog, which was published by the ICA. It will feature essays by Maria Elena Ortiz and Rita Indiana, and an interview by the curator and Artistic Director, Alex Gartenfeld. He stated, “The worlds Dalton Gata creates are poetic meditations on the artist’s complex story, mythology, sexuality, and compelling stories of the Caribbean diaspora—masterfully rendered through surreal and inventive imagery,”

In 2020, Gata participated in a group show at Peres Projects in Berlin. The show titled “Diálogos Remotos,” explored themes of solitude. His awe-inspiring pieces caused quite a stir. Gata was also recently featured in the New York Times as an upcoming gay artist who’s art tells a story. He is definitely one Cuban-American artist to keep an eye on.

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thumbnail May 18

Artist Feature: María Magdalena Campos-Pons

Cuban-American visual artist Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons is having a phenomenal year. She just won a prestigious 50,000 dollar prize from the Perez Art Museum. She garnered recognition not only for her diverse talent in a variety of mediums, and but also for her dedication to social issues. Maria Magdalena is a very special person, not only is she a great, great artist—in photography, in video, in performance—she uses a lot of mediums to express her artistic talents, but she always gives back a lot,” said Jorge Perez. The artist has received well-deserved praise from the artistic community for her dedication. In 2018, Anonymous Was a Woman gifted her with a 25,000 grant.

Campos-Pons is a key figure in post-revolutionary art. In the last three decades, she has received international acclaim. Her work has elements of abstraction and minimalism. Her large scale masterpieces of sharp color and striking imagery have made her as a staple in museum around the world. In addition, she was invited to participate in the Havana Biennial in 2019. The artist is now represented in over thirty museum collections. Some of the major institutions displaying her art include the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, Art Institute of Chicago, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, PAMM, and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

Aside from being a permanent fixture on those grand museum walls, the artist just had some major solo exhibitions. In 2019, “María Magdalena Campos-Pons: Sea and Self” debuted at the Haggerty Museum of Art in August. The show will continue until December 2021. It includes works from the late 1990s to present, including photographs, photographic installations, and a new series of drawings.

Interestingly enough, all of these major merits come towards the later part of her career. She was born in Cuba in 1959. She trained at the Escuela National de Arte in Havana between 1976 and 1979. From 1980 to 1989, she attended Havana’s Instituto Superior de Arte. She has been creating art for over fifty years, and her recent recognition is long overdue.

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thumbnail May 18

Cuban-born Nereida Garcia Ferraz in Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration

Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration highlights more than thirty-five artists, including Cuban-born Nereida Garcia Ferraz. The exhibition is on view across PS1’s first floor galleries in New York City’s Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) from Sep 17, 2020 to Apr 5, 2021. It features the work of artists who have been incarcerated in the United States prison system. The show also presents artworks from non-incarcerated artists who have delved into the theme of imprisonment. One of these artists is Garcia Ferraz. The topic of prisons is one that is relevant to her work. In addition, swince the pandemic, artists created new works to reflect the growing COVID-19 crisis within US prisons.

Nereida García Ferraz was born in Havana in 1954 and migrated to the United States in 1970. She grew up in Chicago and received her BFA from the Art Institute of Chicago in 1981. She utilizes painting, photography, video, sculpture, and social art projects in her work. One of those projects involves women in prison systems. The artist also explores concepts such as feminism, identity, nature, beauty and the physical world.

In Miami, she co-founded 801 Projects at the Jose Marti Building. She also works with education programs such as Women on the Rise at MOCA of North Miami and Brick by Brick, the award-winning outreach education art program at Pérez Art Museum Miami.

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thumbnail Apr 26

PAMM Award to Cuban-American Artist María Magdalena Campos-Pons

The Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) recently awarded Cuban-American artist María Magdalena Campos-Pons their fifty thousand dollar annual Perez Prize. The patron and collector Jorge M. Pérez described Campos-Pons as an “acclaimed professor and artist, who’s touched so many through her work exploring history, race and culture.”

Based in Nashville, Tennessee, the multimedia artist is a professor of fine arts at Vanderbilt University. She was born in 1959 in La Vega, Cuba, a town in the province of Matanzas. In the 1980s, she studied painting at prestigious universities and institutes including the National School of Art in Havana, Cuba. She earned a Master’s in Fine Arts, Painting from the Massachusetts College of Art in Boston. Aside from painting, she utilizes photography, sculpture, film, video, and performance in her pieces.

A descendant of Nigerian slaves brought to the island in the 19th century, the artist tells stories about her ancestors in her work. She creates a socially relevant narrative filled with symbolic imagery that originated in Afro-Cuban folklore. Santeria, a Yoruba-derived religion, was the primary practice of her family. Her autobiographical art presents ideas, figures, and images related to the faith, which was common to slaves. In her performance pieces, she entices audiences with elaborate costumes, which she creates. Her “ritualistic spectacles” express various elements her rich cultural background while providing a rich poignant social commentary.

Campos-Pons’ works are in over thirty museum collections, including the Smithsonian Institution; the Whitney; the Art Institute of Chicago; the National Gallery of Canada; the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Perez Art Museum, Miami; and the Fogg Art Museum.

María Magdalena Campos-Pons’s Wikipedia Page

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thumbnail Apr 26

Another Energy: Power to Continue Challenging

Another Energy: Power to Continue Challenging is the latest exhibit at Mori Art Museum. The Japan-held showcase features the Cuban-American artist Carmen Herrera. The show includes eighteen international female artists within the age range of 71-105. Who said that women reach their prime in their youth? These artists are all in the peak of their career, especially Herrera who recently had her first solo exhibition. She was the ripe old age of 101. The visual artist best known for her minimalist work is the oldest participant at now 105. The exhibit asks the women full of wisdom to express the power to continue in difficult times. In other words, how does one as a culture survive through these challenging tribulations? A knowledge that can only come from experience is sought through the work.

“Amid the unprecedented condition of the world, perhaps the sight of 16 artists, who all have spent their lives walking their own paths with such immovable conviction, may offer us just the strength to tackle the ongoing challenges and to face the future with resilience and determination,” stated the museum.

The exhibition will remain open until September 26, 2021. The artists were not able to attend the opening in Japan due to the pandemic.

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thumbnail Apr 15

Fresh Air: Fresh Art

Perez Art Museum Miami – March 24, 2021 to June 16, 2021

During a time when many locals and visitors are seeking safe art experiences and new ways to explore the great outdoors, PAMM is bringing highlights from its permanent collection to the heart of Miami at the Maurice A. Ferré Park (formerly called Museum Park).

The three-month installation of 19 works throughout the park is entirely free and open to the public. It will feature replicas of works by José Bedia, Ed Clark, Morris Louis, Wangechi Mutu, Beatriz Milhazes, Christina Pettersson, and Sandra Ramos, among others.

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thumbnail Apr 14

Lilian Garcia-Roig wins Guggenheim Fellowship

Lilian Garcia-Roig, chair and professor in the Department of Art at Florida State University, is one of 184 Guggenheim Fellows selected to the class of 2021. She is one of roughly 3,000 artists, writers, scholars, and scientists who participated in the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation’s 97th competition. Her fellowship is in the Creative Arts: Fine Arts category.

Lilian was born in Havana, Cuba in 1966 and was raised in Houston, Texas.

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thumbnail Apr 13

William Osorio – “Margins of Truth”

Cuban-born artist William Osorio presents his second solo exhibition Margins of Truth which follows Inside Out in 2018. A “gestural looseness of unrestrained paint” characterizes his style, a renewed form of Figurative Expressionism. His vibrant, colorful works depict various stages of human existence.

Born in Holguin Cuba in 1989, Osorio began his artistic journey at a young age. He studied at School of Fine Arts in his hometown before emigrating to the United States. While in the states, he taught himself and, consequently, developed a unique style. Overall, he has participated in over twenty shows in the states.

He is currently an Artist-In-Residence at the Bakehouse Art Complex (Miami, FL). In January 2021, the Pérez Art Museum Miami acquired Osorio’s The Cry

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thumbnail Mar 30

Cleveland Museum of Art – Additions to the collection

Cleveland Museum of Art’s Diverse New Acquisitions Range From A 16th-Century Marble ‘Dido’ to Amy Sherald’s ‘Handsome’ Portrait. The acquisitions include a work by Zilia Sánchez -Troyanas (de la serie Módulos Infinitos) [Trojans (of the Infinite Module series)], an impressively scaled modular painting. This work adds to the museum’s contemporary holdings of Latin American art.

Cleveland Museum of Art’s announces new acquisitions to include the work of Zilia Sanchez. The diverse new acquisitions range from a 16th-Century Marble ‘Dido’ to Amy Sherald’s ‘Handsome’ Portrait. The additions include Zilia Sánchez’s Troyanas (de la serie Módulos Infinitos) an impressively scaled modular painting. This work adds to the museum’s contemporary holdings of Latin American art.

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