Tag : cuban american art

thumbnail Apr 17

William Osorio Presents “Margins of Truth”

Cuban-born artist William Osorio presents his second solo exhibition Margins of Truth which follows Inside Out in 2018. A “gestural looseness of unrestrained paint” characterizes his style, a renewed form of Figurative Expressionism. His vibrant, colorful works depict various stages of human existence.

Born in Holguin Cuba in 1989, Osorio began his artistic journey at a young age. He studied at School of Fine Arts in his hometown before emigrating to the United States. While in the states, he taught himself and, consequently, developed a unique style. Overall, he has participated in over twenty shows in the states.

He is currently an Artist-In-Residence at the Bakehouse Art Complex (Miami, FL). In January 2021, the Pérez Art Museum Miami acquired Osorio’s The Cry

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thumbnail Apr 15

Fresh Air: Fresh Art

Perez Art Museum Miami – March 24, 2021 to June 16, 2021

During a time when many locals and visitors are seeking safe art experiences and new ways to explore the great outdoors, PAMM is bringing highlights from its permanent collection to the heart of Miami at the Maurice A. Ferré Park (formerly called Museum Park).

The three-month installation of 19 works throughout the park is entirely free and open to the public. It will feature replicas of works by José Bedia, Ed Clark, Morris Louis, Wangechi Mutu, Beatriz Milhazes, Christina Pettersson, and Sandra Ramos, among others.

Perez Art Museum

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thumbnail Apr 14

Lilian Garcia-Roig wins Guggenheim Fellowship

Lilian Garcia-Roig, chair and professor in the Department of Art at Florida State University, is one of 184 Guggenheim Fellows selected to the class of 2021. She is one of roughly 3,000 artists, writers, scholars, and scientists who participated in the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation’s 97th competition. Her fellowship is in the Creative Arts: Fine Arts category.

Lilian was born in Havana, Cuba in 1966 and was raised in Houston, Texas.

Wikipedia Link

Other posts

Images of her work

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thumbnail Mar 30

Cleveland Museum of Art – Additions to the collection

Cleveland Museum of Art’s Diverse New Acquisitions Range From A 16th-Century Marble ‘Dido’ to Amy Sherald’s ‘Handsome’ Portrait. The acquisitions include a work by Zilia Sánchez -Troyanas (de la serie Módulos Infinitos) [Trojans (of the Infinite Module series)], an impressively scaled modular painting. This work adds to the museum’s contemporary holdings of Latin American art.

Cleveland Museum of Art’s announces new acquisitions to include the work of Zilia Sanchez. The diverse new acquisitions range from a 16th-Century Marble ‘Dido’ to Amy Sherald’s ‘Handsome’ Portrait. The additions include Zilia Sánchez’s Troyanas (de la serie Módulos Infinitos) an impressively scaled modular painting. This work adds to the museum’s contemporary holdings of Latin American art.

CANY Blog Posts

Wikipedia

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thumbnail Mar 25

Tomas Esson: Cuban-American Artist Highlight

Grotesque body parts emerge from surreal backdrops in Tomas Esson’s work. The artist said that his work highlights “the fundamental elements of human life: the vagina, the breast, the mouth, the anus and the penis.” The Cuban-American painter created a lively large scale mural for his first solo museum exhibition. Until May 2, 2021, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Miami (ICA Miami) presents Tomas Esson: The GOAT.  

 “Wet Wall Drawing at ICA” (2020) spreads across a gallery-length wall at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Miami (ICA Miami).  The mural includes “Retrato #29 (Portrait #29)” (1998), one of his earlier works. In this painting,  a horned creature lactates from large udders on a canyon. Behind the juxtaposed images is a dream-like blue sky.  He intertwines graphic black and white drawings with colorful symbolic paintings.  Full of dynamic energy, the paintings incorporate political commentary with stark mythology. They are reminiscent of Salvador Dali’s iconic masterpieces.

The Miami show brings together works from his thirty-year studio practice. Esson was born in Havana, Cuba in 1963.  In 1987, he graduated from the Instituto Superior de Arte in Havana. His first exhibition in Havana in 1988 was censored. The Cuban authorities shut it down because his work criticized the communist government.  In “Mi Homenaje al Che (My Homage to Che)” (1987), a beast and a human are lustfully embraced next to an image of the ruthless communist dictator.

Meanwhile, the David Lewis Gallery in New York is currently showing KRAKEN. They recently started representing the artist. KRAKEN is the artist’s first solo show at the gallery. The display includes his series of Fidel Castro portraits. It also presents Miami Flow, a series that combines animation with abstraction.

Other posts in CANY Blog

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thumbnail Mar 21

Pablo Cano’s “Marvelous Marionette” at NSU Museum of Art

Virtual Resource – At home Art activity

Nova Southeastern University Museum of Art in Ft. Lauderdale is proud to present Pablo Cano’s “Marvelous Marionette.” The Cuban-American artist is best-known for his marionettes. Cano makes puppets out of objects he finds every day. He combines items like empty cardboard boxes of Arborio Rice, Bigelow Green Tea, and Ronzoni pasta to create the puppets. He uses the empty rolls of toilet paper and paper towels for the puppet’s arms and legs. Then, he glues them with Elmer’s glue, and he secures them together with ribbon and masking tape. Finally, he finishes them off with a colorful face.  He paints a comical caricature onto a cardboard box. Like Pinnnchio, the puppets come to life with the artist’s inspiration. The artistic Geppetto implements includes the marionettes into his performance. 

“I realized that puppetry and marionettes had everything I loved about art,” expressed Cano.  “Like an operatic play, I could incorporate music, painting, sculpture, theater, and acting,” he continued.  He created short musical vignettes for his performances.  A lifelong passion, his musical marionettes delight audiences of all ages. 

Cano’s  enchanting musical marionettes will be part of a special performance, part of Free First Thursdays Starry Nights. PNC Arts Alive presents the show. An interactive take home activity for kids is also part of the exhibit. 

Born in Havana, Cuba in 1961, Pablo Cano now lives and works in Miami. Cano’s work is part of the collections of the Cintas Foundation. His work is also included in the of permanent collections of The Lowe Art Museum University of Miami, Florida, the NSU Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, The Perez Art Museum Miami, Florida, The Young At Art Museum, Davie, Florida, and Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, Florida.

Click here to read more about Pablo Cano in the CANY blog.

The NSU fort Lauderdale Museum – Virtual Resource

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thumbnail Mar 11

Ogunquit Museum Exhibits Alberto Rey

Alberto Rey’s work explores identity, place and the natural environment. Rey is one of the first Cuban Americans whose work discusses and investigates the experience of dislocation brought about by immigration.

Alberto Rey was born in Agramonte, Cuba and was raised in Pennsylvania. He now teaches painting at SUNY, Fredonia.

Wikipedia Link

Other posts in CANY Blog

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thumbnail Feb 10

Martínez Celaya’s ‘A Third Of the Night’ Opens in Aspen

Next week, the Baldwin Gallery in Aspen opens a new show titled A Third of the Night. Cuban-born, LA-based Enrique Martínez Celaya is the artist behind the exhibition. The showcase features twelve of his paintings and one sculpture. It opens this Friday, February 12, 2021 and will be on view until March 14th.

Going to Aspen is like a homecoming for the artist who is a fixture in the Aspen arts scene. He has been involved in the Anderson Ranch Arts Center. He has also had exhibitions at the Baldwin Gallery in the past.

Inspired by the Book of Revelations, A Third of the Night explores the concepts of loss and uncertainty. It also expresses an exilic longing for home. The artists took the name of the show from a passage in the biblical text. It reads “a third of the sun was struck, a third of the moon, and a third of the stars, so that a third of them turned dark. A third of the day was without light, and also a third of the night.” Martinez Celaya found the notion of being without light interesting. “That was interesting to me. The aspect of darkness and what it means when you no longer have light for a period, sort of the mystery and confusion of that.”

Martínez Celaya was born in Palos, Nueva Pas Cuba. His family first relocated to Spain when he was eight. Then, at the age of eleven, the artist’s family moved to Puerto Rico. He graduated from Cornell University in 1982 with a Bachelor of Science in Applied Physics and a minor in Electrical Engineering. Later, he earned a Master’s of Science in Quantum Electronics. He patented several laser devices before he received training in art. In 1994, he graduated with highest honors from the M.F.A. program at the University of California.

Blog links to Enrique Martinez Celaya

Wikipedia link

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thumbnail Feb 8

Teresita Fernandez Explores the Disaster of Colonization in Maelstrom

Gallery Lehmann Maupin presents Maelstrom, an exhibition of monumental works from Cuban-American artists Teresita Fernandez. In the show, she explores the topic of colonization through visual poetry.  Immense sculptures and installations feature scenes from natural disasters. The artist conceptualizes violence and devastation through metaphors. In Caribbean Cosmos, Fernandez created a series of mesmerizing vortexes over the Caribbean. The 16-foot-long ceramic panel of mosaics invites viewers to delve deeper into the connection between catastrophic weather events and human biological rhythms.

In Black Beach (Unpolished Diamond), Fernandez uses entangled palm trees and beach debris to portray the chaos of history. It consists of three large panels of charcoal and wood embedded with intertwining layers of material. Édouard Glissant’s essay “The Black Beach” inspired the series. The Caribbean writer, poet, philosopher, and literary critic describes Le Diamant, a beach in southern Martinique, as having a “subterranean, cyclical life.”

Guest may enter the online viewing room to explore a visual essay. It is full of resources including videos, articles, and images. There is a video of an interview with the artist about the research and ideas behind her work.  A reading of Glissant’s poetic essay on the occasion of Maelstrom is also available. Making it even more fun, the gallery provided documentary film footage of Cuba and several essays on Caribbean history. One can even find a map of the Caribbean with original Taino names.

In addition, those curious about the show may request to schedule a visit at the New York gallery.

Blog links to Teresita Fernandez

Wikipedia Link

Link to Video

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thumbnail Feb 8

ART IN WOODEN HEADS

An exhibit by Dorfsman Fine Arts

Art In Wooden Heads is a very unique exhibit presented by Dorfsman Fine Art. It was the brainchild of Silvia Dorfsman, using wooden mannequin heads she asked each of the six artists to create a work. Incredible and awe inspiring works are the result.

The artists are:

  • Jose Bedia
  • Ernesto Capdevilla
  • Liliam Cuenca
  • Ahmed Gomez
  • Noel Morera
  • Carlos Rodríguez Cardenas

CANY Blog posts – Ahmed Gomez

CANY Blog posts – Jose Bedia

CANY Blog posts – Carlos Rodriguez Cardenas

CANY Blog Posts – Liliam Cuenca

Visit CANY Online Gallery

Click on Read more below to see the video.

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