thumbnail Apr 13

William Osorio – “Margins of Truth”

Cuban-born artist William Osorio presents his second solo exhibition Margins of Truth which follows Inside Out in 2018. A “gestural looseness of unrestrained paint” characterizes his style, a renewed form of Figurative Expressionism. His vibrant, colorful works depict various stages of human existence.

Born in Holguin Cuba in 1989, Osorio began his artistic journey at a young age. He studied at School of Fine Arts in his hometown before emigrating to the United States. While in the states, he taught himself and, consequently, developed a unique style. Overall, he has participated in over twenty shows in the states.

He is currently an Artist-In-Residence at the Bakehouse Art Complex (Miami, FL). In January 2021, the Pérez Art Museum Miami acquired Osorio’s The Cry

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thumbnail Mar 30

Cleveland Museum of Art – Additions to the collection

Cleveland Museum of Art’s Diverse New Acquisitions Range From A 16th-Century Marble ‘Dido’ to Amy Sherald’s ‘Handsome’ Portrait. The acquisitions include a work by Zilia Sánchez -Troyanas (de la serie Módulos Infinitos) [Trojans (of the Infinite Module series)], an impressively scaled modular painting. This work adds to the museum’s contemporary holdings of Latin American art.

Cleveland Museum of Art’s announces new acquisitions to include the work of Zilia Sanchez. The diverse new acquisitions range from a 16th-Century Marble ‘Dido’ to Amy Sherald’s ‘Handsome’ Portrait. The additions include Zilia Sánchez’s Troyanas (de la serie Módulos Infinitos) an impressively scaled modular painting. This work adds to the museum’s contemporary holdings of Latin American art.

CANY Blog Posts

Wikipedia

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thumbnail Mar 25

Tomas Esson: Cuban-American Artist Highlight

Grotesque body parts emerge from surreal backdrops in Tomas Esson’s work. The artist said that his work highlights “the fundamental elements of human life: the vagina, the breast, the mouth, the anus and the penis.” The Cuban-American painter created a lively large scale mural for his first solo museum exhibition. Until May 2, 2021, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Miami (ICA Miami) presents Tomas Esson: The GOAT.  

 “Wet Wall Drawing at ICA” (2020) spreads across a gallery-length wall at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Miami (ICA Miami).  The mural includes “Retrato #29 (Portrait #29)” (1998), one of his earlier works. In this painting,  a horned creature lactates from large udders on a canyon. Behind the juxtaposed images is a dream-like blue sky.  He intertwines graphic black and white drawings with colorful symbolic paintings.  Full of dynamic energy, the paintings incorporate political commentary with stark mythology. They are reminiscent of Salvador Dali’s iconic masterpieces.

The Miami show brings together works from his thirty-year studio practice. Esson was born in Havana, Cuba in 1963.  In 1987, he graduated from the Instituto Superior de Arte in Havana. His first exhibition in Havana in 1988 was censored. The Cuban authorities shut it down because his work criticized the communist government.  In “Mi Homenaje al Che (My Homage to Che)” (1987), a beast and a human are lustfully embraced next to an image of the ruthless communist dictator.

Meanwhile, the David Lewis Gallery in New York is currently showing KRAKEN. They recently started representing the artist. KRAKEN is the artist’s first solo show at the gallery. The display includes his series of Fidel Castro portraits. It also presents Miami Flow, a series that combines animation with abstraction.

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thumbnail Mar 21

Pablo Cano’s “Marvelous Marionette” at NSU Museum of Art

Virtual Resource – At home Art activity

Nova Southeastern University Museum of Art in Ft. Lauderdale is proud to present Pablo Cano’s “Marvelous Marionette.” The Cuban-American artist is best-known for his marionettes. Cano makes puppets out of objects he finds every day. He combines items like empty cardboard boxes of Arborio Rice, Bigelow Green Tea, and Ronzoni pasta to create the puppets. He uses the empty rolls of toilet paper and paper towels for the puppet’s arms and legs. Then, he glues them with Elmer’s glue, and he secures them together with ribbon and masking tape. Finally, he finishes them off with a colorful face.  He paints a comical caricature onto a cardboard box. Like Pinnnchio, the puppets come to life with the artist’s inspiration. The artistic Geppetto implements includes the marionettes into his performance. 

“I realized that puppetry and marionettes had everything I loved about art,” expressed Cano.  “Like an operatic play, I could incorporate music, painting, sculpture, theater, and acting,” he continued.  He created short musical vignettes for his performances.  A lifelong passion, his musical marionettes delight audiences of all ages. 

Cano’s  enchanting musical marionettes will be part of a special performance, part of Free First Thursdays Starry Nights. PNC Arts Alive presents the show. An interactive take home activity for kids is also part of the exhibit. 

Born in Havana, Cuba in 1961, Pablo Cano now lives and works in Miami. Cano’s work is part of the collections of the Cintas Foundation. His work is also included in the of permanent collections of The Lowe Art Museum University of Miami, Florida, the NSU Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, The Perez Art Museum Miami, Florida, The Young At Art Museum, Davie, Florida, and Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, Florida.

Click here to read more about Pablo Cano in the CANY blog.

The NSU fort Lauderdale Museum – Virtual Resource

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thumbnail Mar 11

Ogunquit Museum Exhibits Alberto Rey

Alberto Rey’s work explores identity, place and the natural environment. Rey is one of the first Cuban Americans whose work discusses and investigates the experience of dislocation brought about by immigration.

Alberto Rey was born in Agramonte, Cuba and was raised in Pennsylvania. He now teaches painting at SUNY, Fredonia.

Wikipedia Link

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thumbnail Mar 10

Carmen Herrera in “Female Voices of Latin América”

Nineteen countries are represented in the online display. With 150 living artists, the monumental show is the largest presentation of work from Latin American women artists. Cuban-American minimalist pioneer Carmen Herrera is one of the women featured in the show. 

Herrera’s career stands out because of her late recognition. She did not sell her first painting until she was 89 years old.  Her first museum show occurred when she was the ripe age of 101. Overall, the show draws attention to the fact that many Latin American women artists are overlooked in the art community. 

‘We have grown tired of not seeing female artists from Latin America receive the recognition they deserve in their own lifetime, says Elena Saraceni, Curatorial Director, Voices of Latin América and Special Projects Consultant at Vortic.

The cross-generational display includes artwork that spans from 1968 to the present day. Liliana Porter, Beatriz Milhazes, Adriana Varejão, Ad Minoliti, Sol Calero and Valeska Soares are some of the other artists included in the affair.  The grand display covers work from various stages of their careers. 
Guests may enter the “Female Voices of Latin América” exhibition through the Vortic website.

Check out more on Carmen Herrera -CANY Blog

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thumbnail Mar 9

Wifredo Lam’s Painting Sells for 9.6 Million at Sotheby’s

Last June, Sotheby’s marquee virtual auction sold Cuban master Wifredo Lam’s painting Omi Obini (1943). The kaleidoscopic piece sold for $9.6 million, which was almost twice his previous auction record. It is the second highest price ever paid at an auction for a Latin American painting. The first is $9.7 million for Diego Rivera’s Los Rivales (1931) in 2018. 

Recognition of Lam’s paintings has increased over the last decade. In 2012, his painting Ídolo (Oya/Divinité de l’air et de la mort) (1944) sold for $4.5 million. Five years later, another of his important works, A Trois Centimetres de la Terre (1962), sold for $5.2 million. He is one example of the rising interest in Latin American art.

The Cuban-American artist has Asian and African roots. He was born to a Chinese father and an Afro-Cuban mother in the Cuban city of Sagua La Grande in 1902.  After studying art in Havana at the prestigious San Alejandro Academy, he left for Europe. While living in Paris, he befriended Picasso and other avant-garde artists like Andre Breton

His work combines his Afro-Cuban roots with the aesthetics of the Paris school. “Lam knew how to reconcile Western culture with Afro-Cuban traditions, giving birth in America to what we know as magic realism,” explained Roberto Cobas, the curator of Cuban art at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Havana.For example, the artist implements Santería imagery in many of his important paintings, including Omi Obini. In this colorful work, he references the African river deity Oshún.

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thumbnail Feb 24

“Specters of Noon” at Menil Collection

“When the day listlessly drags and delirious visions momentarily reign in the blinding light,” is when acedia is said to possess a person. Acedia is the demon of apathy or laziness. The spirit of acedia is the subject of a recent public program titled Specters of Noon.  Cuban-American artist Guillermo Calzadilla and his partner Jennifer Allora created seven works that summon this spirit.

The artists referenced a text from the fourth century from author Evagrius Ponticus. In laying out the seven deadly sins, he “described the ‘most oppressive’ of all temptations as acedia.” “It is a spiritual dryness and lack of care towards the world that plagues during the hot midday hours,” he continued. It is characterized by a feeling of psychic exhaustion and listlessness.

The creative duo use auditory elements, visual stimulus, and tactile sculptures. They evoke an immersive  atmosphere of stimulation and bewilderment. These giant sculptures of machines spread a cacophonous sound in the atmosphere. The volatile sounds of electricity and power grids disturb the place like the spirit of acedia. The hour is noon, a time when the sun is highest in the sky.  

On Tuesday, March 2nd, from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., Specters of Noon will stream online. One may view the presentation directly on the Menil Collection’s website.  Meni’s YouTube channel will also showcase the live program. 

Allora & Calzadilla – CANY Blog

Wikipedia

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thumbnail Feb 24

Dagoberto Rodriguez

Crystal Planet

Opening Soon

Curated by Aluna Curatorial Collective at Piero Atchugarry Gallery

In Crystal Planet, Rodríguez himself has dared to evoke other modes of utopia that disarm the trap of the great narratives and he gives himself the task of returning to his “true function”: “breaking/interrupting the future and opening it up for us again.”

Moma

Christie’s Auction

Aluna Foundation

Aluna Foundation in the CANY blog

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thumbnail Feb 17

Ricardo Viera At NSU

I Paint My Reality: Surrealism in Latin America

Dates: Exhibit is open – Closing in the fall of 2021

NSU Art Museum of Fort Lauderdale is presenting its current Exhibit – I Paint My Reality a new exhibit examining the flowering of the Surrealism Movement in Latin America.

Works exhibited are from the NSU collection and include works by Leonora Carrington, Frida Kahlo, Wilfredo Lam, Roberto Matta, Amelia Pelaez, Rufino Tamayo, Joaquin Torres-Garcia, Ana Mendieta, Gilberto Ruiz, Ricardo Viera and others.

Ricardo Viera passed away in 2020, Ricardo was a founding member of Cuba Art NY, a member of the board for many years, a friend, teacher, educator, and artist. We are proud of his achievements and proud to share this event with you.

Wikipedia Link

Surrealism – NSU

Lehigh- Remembering Ricardo Viera

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