thumbnail Apr 26

PAMM Award to Cuban-American Artist María Magdalena Campos-Pons

The Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) recently awarded Cuban-American artist María Magdalena Campos-Pons their fifty thousand dollar annual Perez Prize. The patron and collector Jorge M. Pérez described Campos-Pons as an “acclaimed professor and artist, who’s touched so many through her work exploring history, race and culture.”

Based in Nashville, Tennessee, the multimedia artist is a professor of fine arts at Vanderbilt University. She was born in 1959 in La Vega, Cuba, a town in the province of Matanzas. In the 1980s, she studied painting at prestigious universities and institutes including the National School of Art in Havana, Cuba. She earned a Master’s in Fine Arts, Painting from the Massachusetts College of Art in Boston. Aside from painting, she utilizes photography, sculpture, film, video, and performance in her pieces.

A descendant of Nigerian slaves brought to the island in the 19th century, the artist tells stories about her ancestors in her work. She creates a socially relevant narrative filled with symbolic imagery that originated in Afro-Cuban folklore. Santeria, a Yoruba-derived religion, was the primary practice of her family. Her autobiographical art presents ideas, figures, and images related to the faith, which was common to slaves. In her performance pieces, she entices audiences with elaborate costumes, which she creates. Her “ritualistic spectacles” express various elements her rich cultural background while providing a rich poignant social commentary.

Campos-Pons’ works are in over thirty museum collections, including the Smithsonian Institution; the Whitney; the Art Institute of Chicago; the National Gallery of Canada; the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Perez Art Museum, Miami; and the Fogg Art Museum.

María Magdalena Campos-Pons’s Wikipedia Page

CANY Blog Posts

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thumbnail Apr 26

Another Energy: Power to Continue Challenging

Another Energy: Power to Continue Challenging is the latest exhibit at Mori Art Museum. The Japan-held showcase features the Cuban-American artist Carmen Herrera. The show includes eighteen international female artists within the age range of 71-105. Who said that women reach their prime in their youth? These artists are all in the peak of their career, especially Herrera who recently had her first solo exhibition. She was the ripe old age of 101. The visual artist best known for her minimalist work is the oldest participant at now 105. The exhibit asks the women full of wisdom to express the power to continue in difficult times. In other words, how does one as a culture survive through these challenging tribulations? A knowledge that can only come from experience is sought through the work.

“Amid the unprecedented condition of the world, perhaps the sight of 16 artists, who all have spent their lives walking their own paths with such immovable conviction, may offer us just the strength to tackle the ongoing challenges and to face the future with resilience and determination,” stated the museum.

The exhibition will remain open until September 26, 2021. The artists were not able to attend the opening in Japan due to the pandemic.

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thumbnail Apr 18

Cuban Cultural Center presents Amelia Pelaez 2021 award to Baruj Salinas

The Cuban Cultural Center of New York invites you to join the zoom event where they will present lifetime career tribute award to artist Baruj Salinas.

When: Wednesday April 21, 2021

Time: 7 PM Via Zoom

With an introduction by Adriana Herrera and commentary by Janet Batet

Followed by a live Q&A with the artist.

Free Admission to attend

Click: https://youtu.be/R6Xg7kqPTzs


Baruj Salinas Wikipedia Link

CANY Blog posts

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thumbnail Apr 15

Fresh Air: Fresh Art

Perez Art Museum Miami – March 24, 2021 to June 16, 2021

During a time when many locals and visitors are seeking safe art experiences and new ways to explore the great outdoors, PAMM is bringing highlights from its permanent collection to the heart of Miami at the Maurice A. Ferré Park (formerly called Museum Park).

The three-month installation of 19 works throughout the park is entirely free and open to the public. It will feature replicas of works by José Bedia, Ed Clark, Morris Louis, Wangechi Mutu, Beatriz Milhazes, Christina Pettersson, and Sandra Ramos, among others.

Perez Art Museum

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thumbnail Apr 14

Lilian Garcia-Roig wins Guggenheim Fellowship

Lilian Garcia-Roig, chair and professor in the Department of Art at Florida State University, is one of 184 Guggenheim Fellows selected to the class of 2021. She is one of roughly 3,000 artists, writers, scholars, and scientists who participated in the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation’s 97th competition. Her fellowship is in the Creative Arts: Fine Arts category.

Lilian was born in Havana, Cuba in 1966 and was raised in Houston, Texas.

Wikipedia Link

Other posts

Images of her work

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thumbnail Apr 13

William Osorio – “Margins of Truth”

Cuban-born artist William Osorio presents his second solo exhibition Margins of Truth which follows Inside Out in 2018. A “gestural looseness of unrestrained paint” characterizes his style, a renewed form of Figurative Expressionism. His vibrant, colorful works depict various stages of human existence.

Born in Holguin Cuba in 1989, Osorio began his artistic journey at a young age. He studied at School of Fine Arts in his hometown before emigrating to the United States. While in the states, he taught himself and, consequently, developed a unique style. Overall, he has participated in over twenty shows in the states.

He is currently an Artist-In-Residence at the Bakehouse Art Complex (Miami, FL). In January 2021, the Pérez Art Museum Miami acquired Osorio’s The Cry

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thumbnail Mar 30

Cleveland Museum of Art – Additions to the collection

Cleveland Museum of Art’s Diverse New Acquisitions Range From A 16th-Century Marble ‘Dido’ to Amy Sherald’s ‘Handsome’ Portrait. The acquisitions include a work by Zilia Sánchez -Troyanas (de la serie Módulos Infinitos) [Trojans (of the Infinite Module series)], an impressively scaled modular painting. This work adds to the museum’s contemporary holdings of Latin American art.

Cleveland Museum of Art’s announces new acquisitions to include the work of Zilia Sanchez. The diverse new acquisitions range from a 16th-Century Marble ‘Dido’ to Amy Sherald’s ‘Handsome’ Portrait. The additions include Zilia Sánchez’s Troyanas (de la serie Módulos Infinitos) an impressively scaled modular painting. This work adds to the museum’s contemporary holdings of Latin American art.

CANY Blog Posts

Wikipedia

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thumbnail Mar 25

Tomas Esson: Cuban-American Artist Highlight

Grotesque body parts emerge from surreal backdrops in Tomas Esson’s work. The artist said that his work highlights “the fundamental elements of human life: the vagina, the breast, the mouth, the anus and the penis.” The Cuban-American painter created a lively large scale mural for his first solo museum exhibition. Until May 2, 2021, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Miami (ICA Miami) presents Tomas Esson: The GOAT.  

 “Wet Wall Drawing at ICA” (2020) spreads across a gallery-length wall at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Miami (ICA Miami).  The mural includes “Retrato #29 (Portrait #29)” (1998), one of his earlier works. In this painting,  a horned creature lactates from large udders on a canyon. Behind the juxtaposed images is a dream-like blue sky.  He intertwines graphic black and white drawings with colorful symbolic paintings.  Full of dynamic energy, the paintings incorporate political commentary with stark mythology. They are reminiscent of Salvador Dali’s iconic masterpieces.

The Miami show brings together works from his thirty-year studio practice. Esson was born in Havana, Cuba in 1963.  In 1987, he graduated from the Instituto Superior de Arte in Havana. His first exhibition in Havana in 1988 was censored. The Cuban authorities shut it down because his work criticized the communist government.  In “Mi Homenaje al Che (My Homage to Che)” (1987), a beast and a human are lustfully embraced next to an image of the ruthless communist dictator.

Meanwhile, the David Lewis Gallery in New York is currently showing KRAKEN. They recently started representing the artist. KRAKEN is the artist’s first solo show at the gallery. The display includes his series of Fidel Castro portraits. It also presents Miami Flow, a series that combines animation with abstraction.

Other posts in CANY Blog

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thumbnail Mar 21

Pablo Cano’s “Marvelous Marionette” at NSU Museum of Art

Virtual Resource – At home Art activity

Nova Southeastern University Museum of Art in Ft. Lauderdale is proud to present Pablo Cano’s “Marvelous Marionette.” The Cuban-American artist is best-known for his marionettes. Cano makes puppets out of objects he finds every day. He combines items like empty cardboard boxes of Arborio Rice, Bigelow Green Tea, and Ronzoni pasta to create the puppets. He uses the empty rolls of toilet paper and paper towels for the puppet’s arms and legs. Then, he glues them with Elmer’s glue, and he secures them together with ribbon and masking tape. Finally, he finishes them off with a colorful face.  He paints a comical caricature onto a cardboard box. Like Pinnnchio, the puppets come to life with the artist’s inspiration. The artistic Geppetto implements includes the marionettes into his performance. 

“I realized that puppetry and marionettes had everything I loved about art,” expressed Cano.  “Like an operatic play, I could incorporate music, painting, sculpture, theater, and acting,” he continued.  He created short musical vignettes for his performances.  A lifelong passion, his musical marionettes delight audiences of all ages. 

Cano’s  enchanting musical marionettes will be part of a special performance, part of Free First Thursdays Starry Nights. PNC Arts Alive presents the show. An interactive take home activity for kids is also part of the exhibit. 

Born in Havana, Cuba in 1961, Pablo Cano now lives and works in Miami. Cano’s work is part of the collections of the Cintas Foundation. His work is also included in the of permanent collections of The Lowe Art Museum University of Miami, Florida, the NSU Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, The Perez Art Museum Miami, Florida, The Young At Art Museum, Davie, Florida, and Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, Florida.

Click here to read more about Pablo Cano in the CANY blog.

The NSU fort Lauderdale Museum – Virtual Resource

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thumbnail Mar 11

Ogunquit Museum Exhibits Alberto Rey

Alberto Rey’s work explores identity, place and the natural environment. Rey is one of the first Cuban Americans whose work discusses and investigates the experience of dislocation brought about by immigration.

Alberto Rey was born in Agramonte, Cuba and was raised in Pennsylvania. He now teaches painting at SUNY, Fredonia.

Wikipedia Link

Other posts in CANY Blog

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thumbnail Mar 10

Carmen Herrera in “Female Voices of Latin América”

Nineteen countries are represented in the online display. With 150 living artists, the monumental show is the largest presentation of work from Latin American women artists. Cuban-American minimalist pioneer Carmen Herrera is one of the women featured in the show. 

Herrera’s career stands out because of her late recognition. She did not sell her first painting until she was 89 years old.  Her first museum show occurred when she was the ripe age of 101. Overall, the show draws attention to the fact that many Latin American women artists are overlooked in the art community. 

‘We have grown tired of not seeing female artists from Latin America receive the recognition they deserve in their own lifetime, says Elena Saraceni, Curatorial Director, Voices of Latin América and Special Projects Consultant at Vortic.

The cross-generational display includes artwork that spans from 1968 to the present day. Liliana Porter, Beatriz Milhazes, Adriana Varejão, Ad Minoliti, Sol Calero and Valeska Soares are some of the other artists included in the affair.  The grand display covers work from various stages of their careers. 
Guests may enter the “Female Voices of Latin América” exhibition through the Vortic website.

Check out more on Carmen Herrera -CANY Blog

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thumbnail Mar 9

Wifredo Lam’s Painting Sells for 9.6 Million at Sotheby’s

Last June, Sotheby’s marquee virtual auction sold Cuban master Wifredo Lam’s painting Omi Obini (1943). The kaleidoscopic piece sold for $9.6 million, which was almost twice his previous auction record. It is the second highest price ever paid at an auction for a Latin American painting. The first is $9.7 million for Diego Rivera’s Los Rivales (1931) in 2018. 

Recognition of Lam’s paintings has increased over the last decade. In 2012, his painting Ídolo (Oya/Divinité de l’air et de la mort) (1944) sold for $4.5 million. Five years later, another of his important works, A Trois Centimetres de la Terre (1962), sold for $5.2 million. He is one example of the rising interest in Latin American art.

The Cuban-American artist has Asian and African roots. He was born to a Chinese father and an Afro-Cuban mother in the Cuban city of Sagua La Grande in 1902.  After studying art in Havana at the prestigious San Alejandro Academy, he left for Europe. While living in Paris, he befriended Picasso and other avant-garde artists like Andre Breton

His work combines his Afro-Cuban roots with the aesthetics of the Paris school. “Lam knew how to reconcile Western culture with Afro-Cuban traditions, giving birth in America to what we know as magic realism,” explained Roberto Cobas, the curator of Cuban art at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Havana.For example, the artist implements Santería imagery in many of his important paintings, including Omi Obini. In this colorful work, he references the African river deity Oshún.

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thumbnail Feb 24

“Specters of Noon” at Menil Collection

“When the day listlessly drags and delirious visions momentarily reign in the blinding light,” is when acedia is said to possess a person. Acedia is the demon of apathy or laziness. The spirit of acedia is the subject of a recent public program titled Specters of Noon.  Cuban-American artist Guillermo Calzadilla and his partner Jennifer Allora created seven works that summon this spirit.

The artists referenced a text from the fourth century from author Evagrius Ponticus. In laying out the seven deadly sins, he “described the ‘most oppressive’ of all temptations as acedia.” “It is a spiritual dryness and lack of care towards the world that plagues during the hot midday hours,” he continued. It is characterized by a feeling of psychic exhaustion and listlessness.

The creative duo use auditory elements, visual stimulus, and tactile sculptures. They evoke an immersive  atmosphere of stimulation and bewilderment. These giant sculptures of machines spread a cacophonous sound in the atmosphere. The volatile sounds of electricity and power grids disturb the place like the spirit of acedia. The hour is noon, a time when the sun is highest in the sky.  

On Tuesday, March 2nd, from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., Specters of Noon will stream online. One may view the presentation directly on the Menil Collection’s website.  Meni’s YouTube channel will also showcase the live program. 

Allora & Calzadilla – CANY Blog

Wikipedia

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thumbnail Feb 24

Dagoberto Rodriguez

Crystal Planet

Opening Soon

Curated by Aluna Curatorial Collective at Piero Atchugarry Gallery

In Crystal Planet, Rodríguez himself has dared to evoke other modes of utopia that disarm the trap of the great narratives and he gives himself the task of returning to his “true function”: “breaking/interrupting the future and opening it up for us again.”

Moma

Christie’s Auction

Aluna Foundation

Aluna Foundation in the CANY blog

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thumbnail Feb 17

Ricardo Viera At NSU

I Paint My Reality: Surrealism in Latin America

Dates: Exhibit is open – Closing in the fall of 2021

NSU Art Museum of Fort Lauderdale is presenting its current Exhibit – I Paint My Reality a new exhibit examining the flowering of the Surrealism Movement in Latin America.

Works exhibited are from the NSU collection and include works by Leonora Carrington, Frida Kahlo, Wilfredo Lam, Roberto Matta, Amelia Pelaez, Rufino Tamayo, Joaquin Torres-Garcia, Ana Mendieta, Gilberto Ruiz, Ricardo Viera and others.

Ricardo Viera passed away in 2020, Ricardo was a founding member of Cuba Art NY, a member of the board for many years, a friend, teacher, educator, and artist. We are proud of his achievements and proud to share this event with you.

Wikipedia Link

Surrealism – NSU

Lehigh- Remembering Ricardo Viera

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thumbnail Feb 10

Martínez Celaya’s ‘A Third Of the Night’ Opens in Aspen

Next week, the Baldwin Gallery in Aspen opens a new show titled A Third of the Night. Cuban-born, LA-based Enrique Martínez Celaya is the artist behind the exhibition. The showcase features twelve of his paintings and one sculpture. It opens this Friday, February 12, 2021 and will be on view until March 14th.

Going to Aspen is like a homecoming for the artist who is a fixture in the Aspen arts scene. He has been involved in the Anderson Ranch Arts Center. He has also had exhibitions at the Baldwin Gallery in the past.

Inspired by the Book of Revelations, A Third of the Night explores the concepts of loss and uncertainty. It also expresses an exilic longing for home. The artists took the name of the show from a passage in the biblical text. It reads “a third of the sun was struck, a third of the moon, and a third of the stars, so that a third of them turned dark. A third of the day was without light, and also a third of the night.” Martinez Celaya found the notion of being without light interesting. “That was interesting to me. The aspect of darkness and what it means when you no longer have light for a period, sort of the mystery and confusion of that.”

Martínez Celaya was born in Palos, Nueva Pas Cuba. His family first relocated to Spain when he was eight. Then, at the age of eleven, the artist’s family moved to Puerto Rico. He graduated from Cornell University in 1982 with a Bachelor of Science in Applied Physics and a minor in Electrical Engineering. Later, he earned a Master’s of Science in Quantum Electronics. He patented several laser devices before he received training in art. In 1994, he graduated with highest honors from the M.F.A. program at the University of California.

Blog links to Enrique Martinez Celaya

Wikipedia link

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thumbnail Feb 8

Teresita Fernandez Explores the Disaster of Colonization in Maelstrom

Gallery Lehmann Maupin presents Maelstrom, an exhibition of monumental works from Cuban-American artists Teresita Fernandez. In the show, she explores the topic of colonization through visual poetry.  Immense sculptures and installations feature scenes from natural disasters. The artist conceptualizes violence and devastation through metaphors. In Caribbean Cosmos, Fernandez created a series of mesmerizing vortexes over the Caribbean. The 16-foot-long ceramic panel of mosaics invites viewers to delve deeper into the connection between catastrophic weather events and human biological rhythms.

In Black Beach (Unpolished Diamond), Fernandez uses entangled palm trees and beach debris to portray the chaos of history. It consists of three large panels of charcoal and wood embedded with intertwining layers of material. Édouard Glissant’s essay “The Black Beach” inspired the series. The Caribbean writer, poet, philosopher, and literary critic describes Le Diamant, a beach in southern Martinique, as having a “subterranean, cyclical life.”

Guest may enter the online viewing room to explore a visual essay. It is full of resources including videos, articles, and images. There is a video of an interview with the artist about the research and ideas behind her work.  A reading of Glissant’s poetic essay on the occasion of Maelstrom is also available. Making it even more fun, the gallery provided documentary film footage of Cuba and several essays on Caribbean history. One can even find a map of the Caribbean with original Taino names.

In addition, those curious about the show may request to schedule a visit at the New York gallery.

Blog links to Teresita Fernandez

Wikipedia Link

Link to Video

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thumbnail Feb 8

ART IN WOODEN HEADS

An exhibit by Dorfsman Fine Arts

Art In Wooden Heads is a very unique exhibit presented by Dorfsman Fine Art. It was the brainchild of Silvia Dorfsman, using wooden mannequin heads she asked each of the six artists to create a work. Incredible and awe inspiring works are the result.

The artists are:

  • Jose Bedia
  • Ernesto Capdevilla
  • Liliam Cuenca
  • Ahmed Gomez
  • Noel Morera
  • Carlos Rodríguez Cardenas

CANY Blog posts – Ahmed Gomez

CANY Blog posts – Jose Bedia

CANY Blog posts – Carlos Rodriguez Cardenas

CANY Blog Posts – Liliam Cuenca

Visit CANY Online Gallery

Click on Read more below to see the video.

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thumbnail Feb 7

Aimee Garcia in The Game of Ambiguities

The Black Pony Gallery announced the first solo online exhibition for Cuban-American artist Aimee Garcia. It runs from February 5 to March 1, 2021. Garcia is unique because she utilizes the style of portraiture. She often uses herself as the subject. Using just a few strong colors- red, green, and black- in the backdrop, she draws attention to a person’s facial expressions. She also includes lines in her paintings, adding the sensation of psychological tension.

Garcia describes her work as a game. “I seek to establish a game with the meaning of the materials and the objects…” she states in her artist statement. One can observe from the many lines and spaces a kind of interplay between the dimensions that encourages one to pull in and out of the painting. It also feels like a video game due to the exactness and precision of the intersecting lines. Each space takes you to another level. Each dimension represents a subtext of thought. A particular curve of the eyebrow leads towards layers of hidden meanings.

Garcia also considers her art to be feminine and universal. The artist has claimed to dedicate herself to the “the universal feminine experience.” Her series of paintings titled Repression presents themes of subordination, suffering, and pain. She combined stark grey and black tones with red intersecting lines to express heavy sensations. The look in the eyes of the subject convey a strong emotional message of confinement.

Born in Matanzas, Cuba in 1972, Aimee Garcia currently lives and works in Winston Salem, NC, USA. Garcia graduated from the Higher Institute of Art, Havana, in 1996. Her works are in public collections such as the National Museum of Fine Arts, Havana, Cuba and the Pérez Art Museum of Miami, USA.

Link Cuba Art Database

Work for sale

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thumbnail Feb 7

Carmen Herrera in Paris, Exhibit at Dickinsons NY

Dark red, military green and white, these three simple colors pop out of Field of Combat, a painting from 1952. Carmen Herrera is the Cuban-American artist who created the work.   

The abstract piece made up of these stark colors is the highlighted work at Dickinson’s TEFAF Online New York 2020 presentation. Currently, the private auction house, Dickinsons New York, is presenting an exhibit called “Carmen Herrera in Paris.”

It includes eight paintings dated from 1949-1953, including Field of Combat.  During this time, Herrera lived in Paris, France. She responded to the European avant-garde. She engaged with the Bauhaus and Russian Suprematism. One of Herrera’s first mature pieces Castilla la Vieja [Venetian Red, White and Black] (1949) is also featured in the show. Dickinsons is also presenting three pieces inspired from Herrera’s trip back to Cuba during the holidays in 1950. 

Unlike her sharp paintings, Herrera is a lively character. At 105 years old, she is finally getting the recognition she deserves. Not only was she a woman in a male dominated field but she was also a Cuban exile. About her late fame, she expressed: “If you wait for the bus, it will come. I waited 98 years for the bus to come.” 

All works are for sale and on display from 2 November – 27 February, 2021 at Dickinson New York, 980 Madison Ave, New York.

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thumbnail Jan 28

Cuban-American Artist Carmen Herrera Featured The Met’s Virtual Exhibit

During these trying times, visiting museums and galleries is a possible risk to one’s health, so artists have been unable to display their work using traditional methods.  Yet, the show must go on. Professionals from the art world are no strangers to innovation. Some of the world’s most prestigious institutions are leading the way with new ways to share art with the public. For example, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York is currently launching a virtual exhibit for the Fall. 

To make it more engaging for the public, the museum has implemented interactive experiences in the virtual exhibition. These include augmented reality versions of the best art pieces. Aside from virtual reality technology, the museum will provide a gaming experience for guests.  They will enjoy answering trivia questions and riddles. In addition, a Zoom and Spot challenge will allow visitors to read any description and content regarding the art pieces. A game called Analysis will present the underdrawings of famous paintings, as well as other hidden details, giving people a chance to guess the work.

Almost fifty pieces of art from the Met’s collection will come to life. The interactive exhibit will be available to the public free of charge for five weeks. The digitally rendered galleries will showcase some of the most well-known artists in the world. Included in the line-up is one of our own: Cuban-American artist Carmen Herrera.  In addition, the virtual exhibit will display the work of  Mark Bradford, Sam Gilliam, and Ek Anatsui. Another major feature of the show is a 14th century Chinese mural, which features the Buddha of Medicine and the Temple of Dendur.

Link:>>Other Carmen Herrera posts in the CANY Blog

Link:>>Wikipedia

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thumbnail Jan 27

Carlos Estévez: Urban Universes projections at Coral Gables City Hall building

Coral Gables City Hall: 405 Baltimore Way

February 12 – March 15, 2021

Cuban born, Miami based artist Carlos Estévez will be creating his first technology-based artwork. Based on Estevez’s paintings and sculptures, this new projection mapped immersive work  will be cast on the entire surface of the historic Coral Gables City Hall building. The artist’s previous work seems to capture a moment of time but for this new commission, Estévez will work with a team of animators to develop the video content about people’s movement, interaction, and sense of community. He has always contemplated working in this way but due to costs and need for technical support has waited for a moment like this. We are proud to be presenting this work every evening for the month-long exhibition period.

In tandem with the video mapped projection piece, Estevez is creating an educational tool and interactive artwork with our educational partners Florida International University Art & Art History Department and the Miami Dade County Public Schools. Through a demonstration video, art teacher workshops and in personal lessons, Estevez hopes to inspire and help the children and their families in the district make kites that are based on identity, self-portraiture, and inclusivity.

ARTIST STATEMENT:

“Urban Universes is the most exciting project of my career. The work consists of the animation of various passers-by or characters that I portray in my paintings. This work pays homage to the City of Coral Gables and its inhabitants. Coral Gables is one of the oldest and both culturally and historically rich cities in South Florida, especially the street of Miracle Mile and its surroundings. The heart of the city is a center of leisure for locals and tourists. My work will be projected on the entire City Hall facade. The images will be imaginary representations of people passing by, walking, and conversing amongst themselves, projecting their goals and dreams, just like the people that inhabit this city. These people are portraits of different individuals that come across one another fortuitously. I wanted to imagine the inner world of people, their identities, and emotions, which I translate with lines and colors. Each person that walks by the city will see their reflection in some of the characters in this piece, identify with the characters will make them feel included, and also feel like a part of this city.

Urban Universes is the work that I am presenting for the Illuminate Coral Gables exhibition. It is orchestrated by curator Lance Fung whose vision is to take the artworks of individual artists to an urban community. It is going to be a fascinating experience that reverses the ordinary dynamic of art. Rather than going into museums, galleries, or art institutions, the art will find and amuse you on the streets of your city.”

Carlos Estévez at CANY blog

More about Carlos Estévez

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thumbnail Jan 25

Dreaming with Lions

This is an important artist and an important work. The exhibit closed on December 9, 2020 but it bears mentioning.

Faena Art unveiled a monumental site-specific artwork on Miami Beach as part of Miami Art Week 2020.

The monumental site-specific installation entitled ‘Dreaming with Lions’ by Miami-based Cuban artist Alexandre Arrechea is located on the beach directly in front of Faena Hotel and is free and open to view until Sunday, 6 December 2020. This new work within the Faena District provides a safe environment for the local community to explore and interact with public art.

Alexander Arrechea page

Town & Country magazine link

Alexander Arrechea Wikipedi link

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thumbnail Jan 20

“Somos La Luz” Mural Commemorates COVID-19 Death

 Cuban-American artist Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada created a 20,000-square-foot mural in Queens, New York to commemorate one of the health care practitioners who lost his life during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Ydelfonso Decoo is the name of the Queen’s, New York doctor who succumbed to the virus. He worked on the front lines in New York City in the Spring of 2020. Known all over the world, Rodriguez-Gerada partnered with SOMOS Community Care.  The health network serves immigrants and other organizations.

The mural is in a parking lot outside The Queens Museum. It’s near the iconic Unisphere globe from New York’s 1964 World’s Fair. The artwork is titled “Somos la Luz” (We Are the Light).  It draws attention to the disproportionate amount of Latino and Black casualties of the virus.  The enormity of the painting reflects the large amount of victims of Covid-19 in the minority community. 

“It’s not just making something big, just for the sake of it, it’s also because what you’re saying is [this] important enough that it merits it,” says Rodriguez-Gerada.

The artist posted a YouTube video about the project in September. He noted “In New York City the coronavirus is killing Latinos and Blacks at double the rate that it is killing whites and Asians.” He gave statistics about the casualties. In addition, he urged the community to come together. 

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thumbnail Jan 20

STILL I RISE, Cuban artist Armando Mariño at Galerie Anne de Villepoix, Paris

Cuban artist Armando Mariño exhibits his works at Galerie Anne de Villepoix, Paris from January 19 to March 6, 2021.

Galerie Anne de Villepoix :18 rue du Moulin Joly, 75011 Paris – France

More about Armando Mariño

Armando Mariño at CANY

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thumbnail Jan 20

Quarantine: 40 Days and 40 Nights

Cuban-born visual artist, Geandy Pavón, created a series of stunning photographs during the quarantine of 2020.  Quarantine: 40 Days and 40 Nights is now on display at the Coral Gables Art Museum.  Guests can visit the exhibit in the museum’s Community Meeting Room until February 1, 2021. 

Starting on March 18, 2020 Pavón, originally from Las Tunas, Cuba, released a photograph a day on social media for forty days.  Along with his partner,  Imara López, they produced visually captivating images, which garnered them a following. Using the internet as a lifeline, he connected with people through the imagery. They captured scenes detailing domestic struggles of life during the lockdown, but they turned them into poetry. 

Using limited resources while trapped in López’s Buffalo, NY apartment, the artists wowed his viewers with his imaginative creations. He used simple objects such as flashlights and cardboard to reenact art history classics and popular religious rituals. 

In addition to the photographs, Pavón recorded video narrating the process of creating the artworks. In the exhibition room, guests will enjoy A soundtrack by renowned musician Paquito D’Rivera, created specifically for the exhibition. The soundtrack is comprised of two versions of the iconic La Bella Cubana, written by Afro-Cuban 20c composer, José Lafitte White.This exhibition was originally exhibited virtually at the Art Museum of the Americas in Washington, D.C.

More Geandy Pavon Posts

Link to In art we trust

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thumbnail Jan 19

Cuban American Artist honored with New USPS Stamp

Emilio Sanchez is the first Cuban American visual artist in history honored on a United States Postal Service stamp. The USPS dedicated the new series of Forever Stamps to Sanchez on the centennial anniversary of his birth in 1921. They will be released in the Summer of 2021.

The four stamps issued will reproduce four of his paintings. One of these works is Untitled (Ventanita entreabierta) from 1981, an oil and watercolor on paper. It belongs to the permanent collection of Caribbean Art at the Lowe Museum of Art in the University of Miami. 

Equally significant is that Victor Deupi a Professor of Architectural History at the University of Miami researched and wrote about Sanchez.  Deupi first learned about the Cuban visual artist when he visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art. “I had never heard of him until then, and before you know it, I began my research on Sanchez,” recounted Deupi to News@theU. 

He, along with many others at the University, is very excited about the announcement because it brings attention Cuban American art and culture. 
“It’s a wonderful honor on many fronts because it gives so many voices to people of different races and ethnic backgrounds,” explained to Deupi News@theU.

More posts on Emilio Sanchez

Wikipedia article on Emilio Sanchez

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Agustin Fernandez: Armaduras

ICA Miami invites you to a Zoom presentation on the release of its latest publication on Agustin Fernandez.

Thursday January 21, 2021 at 2 PM


Sign-up here to our Zoom Registration Link

More on Agustin Fernandez from the CANY Blog

Wikipedia link

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Rubén Torres-Llorca, José Bedia, Cruz Azaceta, González-Torres, Ana Mendieta, Sandra Ramos, Carlos Rodríguez Cárdenas, among Cuban artists included in “A to Z of Caribbean Art”, an anthology of artists of the Caribbean

Robert & Christopher Publishers, a Trinidad-based art book imprint, has published an anthology of important artists from the Caribbean, including Cuban artists from the diaspora.

A to Z of Caribbean Art is a joyous celebration of the lives and works of many of the most outstanding, prolific, groundbreaking, critical, fascinating, and controversial artists of the Caribbean. Thanks to the abécédaire format of this book, a multiplicity of artists have ended up in lively dialogue here. We connect people separated by geography, language, and time: 120 years of movements, moments, schools, and sociopolitical contexts; countries as far apart as Bermuda in the north to Guyana in the south; and the French, Dutch, English, and Spanish Caribbean.

Each artist is represented by a page that shows a definitive work, biographical details, and a short write-up about their oeuvre. These artists were selected based on a number of factors, including critical discourse around their work, inclusion in a significant publication, work written about in regional or international trade magazine, and participation in a curated exhibition at a major institution, or at a regional or international biennial.

Rubén Torres Llorca One of Us Can Be Wrong (2010)

Paperback: 304 pages
Published by: Robert & Christopher Publishers, November 2019
ISBN: 978-976-95344-9-0
Language: English

Cuban artists in CANY blog

Videos of Cuban artists in Youtube

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Cabin Fever Artist Talks – Features Cuban-born Jorge Wellesly

The Visual Arts Center of New Jersey recently launched another video installment of their Cabin Fever Artist Talks. In this latest episode, Cuban-born artist Jorge Wellesly discusses his art. His work is about the relationship between truth, reality and language. The artist states, “I have seen that language is not enough to interpret reality and to communicate truth.” He often uses text in relation to social issues.  But he also uses symbolic elements such as billboards or public signs. He explains that they “remind us of how the power addresses us through media, advertising and now social media.” 

A multidisciplinary artist, Jorge uses various media such as painting, drawing, sculpture, and installation. He always strives to express the complexity of how to create meaning and sense. 

Influenced by Bauhaus and the Black Mountain College, he pays attention to the combination of several disciplines like architecture, science and art.  He also takes ideas from the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein who explained that “language is an arbitrary but necessary tool to build our reality.”  

When he lived in Cuba, his art was a mirror of social and political upheaval.  “Any art that criticized the communist government was censored or even punished with incarceration,” he said. For instance, in 2012 the Cuban government denied his artworks for the Havana Biennial.  They claimed the text was politically incorrect.

His move to the US impacted him personally and artistically. In 2019, he completed his first public sculpture. It includes four letters that spell SOUL in different colors to represent human diversity. He currently lives in Guttenberg, NJ.

The Cabin Fever Artist Talks provides methods for bringing people art at home safely as the Covid-19 health crisis continues.  It includes videos of artists detailing their artistic process and presenting studio tours.  

More info on Jorge Wellesly- Cuban Art Database, Cuba Art News

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Tomás Esson: The GOAT at Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami

Until May 2, 2021

Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami

61 NE 41st Street
Miami, FL 33137

Cuban artist Tomás Esson exhibits works from the last thirty years.

“Tomás Esson: The GOAT” is the first solo museum presentation for Cuban painter Tomás Esson. On this occasion, ICA Miami brings together works spanning his thirty-year studio practice alongside a site-specific mural and a commissioned reinterpretation of his early painting installations.

From his very first exhibition in Havana in 1988, which was censored and closed by Cuban authorities, Esson has created lively and grotesque paintings loaded with dynamic energy, mythological references, and political commentary. The presentation will include early works, as well as painting from Esson’s “Retrato” (Portraits) series and his “Wet Paintings” series. Each of these three bodies of works began in one of the different cities where Esson has lived and worked—the early paintings in Havana, the “Retratos” in Miami, and the “Wet Paintings” in New York City.

For more information check out: https://icamiami.org/exhibition/tomas-esson/

Tomás Esson at CANY blog

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MARIO PETRIRENA RECOLLECTS IN MOOD RING

“Don’t be afraid to make mistakes, to fail,” advises Cuban-American artist Mario Petrirena.  He shared his personal philosophy in Mood Ring. Mood Ring is a segment of Burnaway. Burnaway publishes a magazine and daily content that celebrates art in the South. Mario is the latest artist to be featured in Mood Ring. His article is titled “Mario Petrirena: Personal Thoughts on Process and Progress.” In the short journal-style piece, he provides guidance for budding artists as well as overall tips on living life. He writes: “You have to have a certain strength to put your work out there. Do it. The good, the bad and the ugly; all make us who we are.”

Along with his advice on art and life, he also shared photographs of his current works in progress. He collects old items and pieces from magazines to create collages in his artworks.

Mario Petrirena lives and works in Atlanta. His artworks, which include sculpture and installation, often express his dual-heritage and identity as an exile.  Petrirena attended the Rochester Institute of Technology School for American Craftsmen and the University of Florida. His work is visible in the collections of the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA; the Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale, FL; Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, The Cintas Foundation, NY; the Carter Presidential Center, the Paul Jones Collection at the University of Delaware; MOCA GA, the Ogden Museum in New Orleans and numerous private collections.

Read more about Mario Petrirena on the CANY Blog

Cintas Foundation Link

Cuba Art NY Link

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María Magdalena Campos in Group Show ALIEN NATIONS 2020 at Coral Gables Museum

Carole A. Fewell Gallery

December 1st, 2020 – March 14th, 2021

Cuban Artist María Magdalena Campos is part of the group show ALIEN NATIONS 2020 at the Coral Gables Museum in Miami.

Alien Nations 2020 gathers a group of artists who convey different forms of alienation. It looks at a myriad of issues that are affecting the psychological state of the individual and the different groups within which we live.

Nearly two dozen creatives, both emerging and established, many with connections to South Florida, exhibit works in a broad range of media – painting, photography, sculpture, installation, video, and performance documentation. Inscribed in a long tradition of responses to troubled times, these pieces not only portray the current socio-political and economic landscape, but also share sensitive insights into the direction of our humanity, and hope for the future.

Events:

January 9 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Artist Panel: Alien Nations

To RSVP for the panel: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcsc-mqrz0oHdL1ZVt3QpNfuva_RbEuSMUB

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the conversation.

María Magdalena Campos at CANY BLOG

María Magdalena Campos online

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thumbnail Jan 4

Guttenburg Arts Presents Winter/Fall Residencies

The Space and Time Artist Residency (STAR) from Guttenburg Arts provides $1,200 stipend to cover materials, travel and lodging for awardees. Gutenberg Arts provides artists with opportunities to create cultural experiences.  

Artists gain access to a professional workspace for the visual arts that includes printmaking, dark room and ceramics facilities. The duration of the residency is three months, and it is located in Guttenberg, New Jersey.  Each participant gains a spot in a group show at the end. In addition, they will spend at least fifteen hours in the studio.  The 4,500 sq. ft. space is open twenty-four hours, seven days a week.  Towards the end of the program, artist give a free public artist lecture or workshop. 

The residency is a prime opportunity in the tri-state area. Successful Artists visit the residents, which gives them a chance to be seen.  After all, in the arts, as in almost everything else, it’s all about who you know.  
The deadline to apply is January 31, 2021. Gutenberg Arts just tweeted on January 1st. “We’ve extended our Open Call for the Fall ’21 & Winter ’22 Space and Time Artist Residency!  Apply at http://guttenbergarts.submittable.com/submit by January 31st!  As always it’s #freetoapply

Link to Guttenberg arts page:–>http://www.guttenbergarts.org

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“Artivism” in Today’s Cuba for Free Expression

Now is the time more than ever to support Cuban artists.  Many Cubans have fled the island because of political oppression. Many more have left for economic reasons.  A few have escaped due to artistic limitations on their freedom of expression. In fact, at the moment on the island, there is a whole community of artists who are protesting for freedom of expresion.  On November 27, 2020, over 300 artists and their supporters protested in front of the Ministry of Cuba.  

Artist and Writer Coco Fusco journaled the event for the Museum of Modern Art in New York.  For her article “The Right to Have Rights,” she interviewed a series of artists: Camila Lobón, Julio Llópiz Casal, Luis Manuel Otero Alacantra, and Reynier Leyva Novo.

They call the new “artivist” movement 27N. It is a reaction to police brutality towards The San Isidro Movement, a group of artists staging a hunger strike against the arrest of a rapper. 
The event on the 27th was unprecedented because thirty of the protestors were allowed inside to speak with political leaders.  “I personally had never experienced such a democratic event in Cuba before,” said Julio Llópiz Casal.

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Cuba Art NY

Fall online exhibit – Closing event

The icing on the cake… after an incredible online exhibit – the closing event. CANY presents in conjunction with Rialta Magazine – Four Art historians, art curators discuss the 8 women artists included in the CANY online fall show. <<In Spanish>>

Don’t miss it !

Ninguna mujer es una isla: ocho artistas en CANY Conversatorio con la participación de Suset Sánchez, María de Lourdes Mariño, Janet Batet, Meyken Barreto y Tanya Álvarez.

The artists exhibited are:

Kenia Arguiñao

Consuelo Castañeda

Sandra Cordero

Liliam Cuenca

Ana Albertina Delgado

Aimee Garcia

Connie Lloveras

Danay Vigoa

Click Read More below to see Video.

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Weaving a Familial History in Cuban-American Piñatas

Multidisciplinary artist Elizabeth Mesa-Gaido is currently participating in  A Common Thread: Textiles Past & Present. She expresses themes related to her experience as a Cuban exile in her work.  In Cuban-American Piñatas, she wove together colorful fabrics into suitcase-shaped piñatas. They represent her journey back to her homeland. Like many other Cuban-Americans, she visited the island with her family. They carried suitcases packed with goods and supplies to distribute to those in need. 

The piñata suitcases allude to the concept of redistribution of goods, which is the basis of communism. Even though pinatas are typically Mexican, the artist uses them to highlight a communal activity. Each person picks a ribbon and grabs the shared goods within. “It’s ironic because we think of communism as a group activity, and yet for many, it hasn’t worked out so well when commodities cannot be distributed to everybody that needs them,” expressed Mesa-Gaido. 

Her Cuban-American Piñatas and other works are currently part of  A Common Thread: Textiles Past & Present.  The exhibit showcases contemporary innovations in textile art. It will be on display through Jan. 9, 2021 at The Art Center of Greenwood in South Carolina. 

She is currently Professor of Art at Morehead State University.

Check out more articles about Mesa-Gaido from the CANY blog!

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The DAM Presents a two film installation by Ana Mendieta


The Denver Art Museum presents Suspended Fire, a two film installation from Cuban-born artist Ana Mendieta which will run from December 6, 2020 to March 7, 2021. This work will make you think. It explores the voyage of civilization to understand the concept of light from both a physical standpoint and a metaphorical one. 

Ana Mendieta was born in Cuba in 1948. She died in NYC in 1985. She is best known for using her body as an instrument in her art. In the Silueta Series, she places images of her naked body against various backdrops like space or a fallen tree.

 Wikipedia link

Posts on Ana Mendieta

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Open Call for Miami Artists: Locust Projects Gifts in Wavemaker Grants

Attention Miami artists, curators, and collectives! Locust Projects, Miami’s longest running alternative art space, has announced an open call for grants. Information sessions will begin in January 2021 and applications will be due in the Spring. They have awarded $399,000 in arts grants since 2015. During this period, they have gifted up to $6,000 to seventy-seven of Miami’s most visionary artists, curators, and collectives.  

Locust Projects is a local leader in exhibiting innovative works. They take risks outside of traditional art markets and institutions and provide artists with an outlet for experimentation.  Their mission as a non-profit organization includes engaging the local community. They publish, present and produce completed works for view at their location in Miami’s Design District.

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts makes the Wavemaker Grants possible.  They are the first regional regranting program in the southeast. They are part of a national network together with sixteen other Warhol-initiating regranting programs. Awards categories include three groups: Research & Development + Implementation, New Work / Projects, and Long-Haul Projects. 

In 2020, Wavemaker at Locusts awarded $6,000 to four artists in each of the categories. One of the grantees in the area of Long-Haul Projects was Cuban-american artist Sebastian Duncan-Portuondo. In his work Project Exile, he explored the experiences of exiles in the community as marginalized people.    

This year they are allowing grantees affected by COVID-19 to use fifty percent of the funds for supplementary income. Locust Projects encourages artists to adapt their creative vision to concepts explored in light of the pandemic. 

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El Museo del Barrio Commemorates Cuban Protest Artists

El Museo del Barrio is a non-profit arts organization dedicated to preserving Latino, Caribbean, and Latin American culture.  Contrary to the name, it’s more than just a museum. It’s a cultural institution with educational programs, film screenings, art exhibitions, and social gatherings.  It’s a hub for Hispanic arts and culture art in the heart of New York City. 

Recently, they commemorated Cuban artists who bring awareness to the injustices occurring in Cuba in a series of Facebook posts. As they stated in the posts: “Cuban art has been a vital part of the mission of El Museo del Barrio over the years as shown through its exhibition program and Permanent Collection.”  

Over the week of December 7 to December 12, five artists were featured.  The artists have all created works of art that speak to the diaspora. This week, we are proud to highlight works by Cuban artists, who courageously, through visual arts, bring light and awareness to the escalation of human rights violations they endure.” 

One of the artists, Tania Bruguera, was incarcerated by the Cuban government.  A photograph from her 1998 performance art piece titled The Burden of Guilt is featured in the post. She is holding the carcass of an animal. In the shocking piece, she draws attention to human rights violations in Cuba. In her artistic statement, she describes it well: “The burden is really the slaughtered lamb that hangs from the neck like a shield, like an open wound that reveals what’s inside.  The lamb is the weight that is carried as a consequence, as well as a symbolic attitude; the emotion, saltwater, which drops like tears and washes the earth, which is the guilt, before it is digested.
Another of them is Roberto Cartel whose exemplary piece Cartel de Propoganda Conferencia de Derechos Humanos from 1994 is known for drawing attention to human rights violations in Cuba.

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Panel discussion “Ninguna mujer es una isla: ocho artistas en CANY”

Panel discussion in conjunction with our current exhibition, Fall for Her

Tuesday, December 15 2020 4 pm EST (GMT -5) ****This panel is in Spanish.****

Via Facebook Live: Click here

Participants:

Suset Sánchez, María Lourdes Mariño, Janet Batet, Meyken Barreto, Tanya Álvarez (moderadora)

CANY online exhibit FALL FOR HER

CANY Online Gallery

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Miami Art Week: Faena Art Features Cuban-born Artist

“Now is no time to think of what you do not have. Think of what you can do with what there is,” is a passage easily applicable to today’s time. Cuban-born artist Alexandre Arrechea took it directly from the text of Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea. The novel is the literary inspiration for his latest installation Dreaming with Lions. Faena Art will present it on the beach until December 6.

The colossal installation was assembled in front of the Faena Hotel on Miami Beach during Miami Art Week. It is an existential work with many symbols. Measuring a 62’ diameter, the work resembles a giant forum-style library.  Arrechea also incorporated beach towels with illustrated phrases, like the one above, from the novel.      

Through the artwork, the artist seeks to express the sheer force of the human spirit during these perilous times.  He reconstructs the ideals of hope, faith and strength of the human spirit prevail in the face of the moral challenges.  The library style of the work further enhances the ideological constructs. 

“Dreaming with Lions” proposes action and reflection. That we reflect upon coherence and respect of oneself and others, and that we continue to invent ways to confront our destiny while maintaining integrity and grandeur,” expressed the artist. 

Arrechea was born in Trinidad, Cuba in 1970, and he currently lives in Miami, FL.  He graduated from the Instituto Superior de Arte (ISA) of Havana in 1994.

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Miami Businessman Promotes Cuban Art with Fine Arts on the Plate

Fine Arts on the Plate is the current exhibition of Cuban art displayed at the Kendall Art Center (KAC).  Forty-five artists of Cuban origin who live outside of the island have participated in the show. KAC will display the plate art at their showroom in South West Miami until February 2021. 

The founder Leonardo Rodriguez conceived of the idea to have artists paint on original plates instead of large canvases as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.  He wanted to not only bring back the forgotten art of ceramics but also provide a financial opportunity for artists.  “Not everyone has 8 or 10 thousand dollars to buy a canvas, but anyone has one thousand or one thousand two hundred dollars to pay for a plate,” he explained to Alona Martinez of the Miami Herald. 

Originally from Cuba, Rodriguez founded the art center because he wanted to promote Cuban artists working outside the island. He is committed to helping artists who are exiled from Cuba. “The Cuban artist, when he leaves Cuba, is forgotten…I wanted to show the world that the artist that is in Miami keeps being a Cuban artist and is very professional,” he mentioned to the Herald. Even though most of the artists that KAC exhibits are from Miami, they have also displayed the art of Cuban artists living in Japan, Spain, and Boston.  

The Kendall Art Center is a non-profit organization, which opened to the public in the summer of 2016. Rodriguez created the gallery accidentally in order to house his vast collection of Cuban art. He began collecting pieces as a young adult in Cuba. His mother worked at the renowned Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes. As a young child, he garnered a love for art. He had access to one of Cuba’s most extensive art collections.  He needed a space to store all of the art overflowing in his home. It was more of an experiment to the business owner, who was unsure if anyone would visit the center. To his surprise, about 200 people attended the private collection.  Now, about 20,000 people visit the KAC yearly.  With over 600 pieces, his private art collection is one of the largest collections of contemporary Cuban art in Miami.

Link:—> Wikipedia

Link:—> KAC web page

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Cuban-American artist ERNESTO BRIEL exhibit’s IRIDESCENT GEOMETRIES at Juan Carlos Maldonado Art Collection

DATE: Thursday, November 19, 2020 –
Saturday, March 20, 2021

TIME: Tuesdays to Fridays 10:30 am – 5 pm, Saturdays: 11am – 4pm

PLACE: Juan Carlos Maldonado Art Collection

The Juan Carlos Maldonado Art Collection presents our new exhibition of cuban artist Ernesto Briel: Iridescent Geometries. 

Since its inception in 2005, the driving force behind the Juan Carlos Maldonado Art Collection, JCMAC, has been to recognize and generate awareness on the contribution that Geometric Abstraction has made to art history in the twentieth century. With the title Iridescent Geometries, JCMAC gives continuity to the exhibition project that began six years ago.

Since then, its objective has been to promote the study of modern and contemporary art at an international level, with an emphasis on abstract-geometric practices. On this occasion, and after having exhibited part of the collection, he focuses his attention on the work of Ernesto Briel, a Cuban optical artist whose production is practically unknown, even among specialists in Latin American art.

Ernesto Briel at Sotheby’s, by Gustavo Valdés

Ernesto Briel at CANY Blog

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FOCUS: exhibit by Cuban-American Photographer Mario Algaze

November 3 – December 31, 2020

Mario Algaze is a contemporary Cuban-American photographer whose work celebrates the culture of Latin America.

In 1960, at the age of thirteen, Algaze was exiled from Cuba with his family. He relocated to America and settled in Miami, Florida. Miami offered a rich cultural mecca that encouraged Algaze to travel throughout Central and South America. These trips allowed him a glimpse of belonging within a familiar culture.

In finding his identity after exile, he began photographing Latin America in the 1970’s while reconnecting with the feeling of home. His photographs embody the everyday of Latin life. Between his travels in the late 70’s, Algaze studied visual art at Miami Dade College. Algaze’s masterful command of light illuminates his street scenes that detail the struggles and victories of Latin culture.

Mario Algaze is the recipient of various acclaimed awards, including the Florida Artist Fellowship from the Florida Arts Council (1985), the Cintas Foundation Fellowship in Photography (1991), the Visual Arts Fellowship and the SAF Artist Fellowship sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts. In 1992, he received the National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Photography.

Mario Algaze at Wikipedia

Mario Algaze at CANY Blog

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Cuban-American Gladys Triana Interviewed for VoCA Talk Series

In January 2020, contemporary art conservator and VoCA colleague Ruth del Fresno-Guillem interviewed Cuban-American artist Gladys Triana. They discussed her philosophical influences, her family life, and her life-long career. The discussion is part of the fifth season of the ongoing VoCA (Voices in Contemporary Art) Talks series. The Talk series is hosted in partnership with the Joan Mitchell Foundation’s Creating a Living Legacy (CALL) Program.

Links:

Wikipedia Link

Cintas Foundation Fellow

Search in CANY Blog


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105-Year-Old Artist Carmen Herrera Has a New Mural in East Harlem

Carmen Herrera, the 105-year-old Cuban American abstract painter, has a new mural in East Harlem. Uno, Dos, Tres just went up on the walls of the Manhattan East Academy, a school on E. 100th Street. Painted by students from across the city, through a partnership with the arts and education nonprofit Publicolor, it’s a mesmerizing black-and-white optical pattern that’s two stories tall, and visible from the FDR.

When Herrera was approached to do the installation, what excited her the most wasn’t the mural itself; it was that students would be painting it. The students were supposed to paint the piece ahead of her birthday in May, but the coronavirus pandemic delayed the process. It took the students ten weeks to complete the mural, which is composed of 96 separate boards that were assembled on site.

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Cuban-American Master Embraces the Chaos of Covid

Cuban-American master Luis Cruz Azaceta has created five new pieces during the lockdown of 2020. The artist transmuted the chaos of the pandemic into his artistic vision. He addresses the “poetic window of the virus and its state of mutation; a cacophony of horror and beauty” in his Pandemia paintings.

“Luis Cruz Azaceta: Personal Velocity in the Age of Covid,” will be on display at the Lyle O. Reitzel Gallery in Santo Domingo from Nov. 26th, 2020 to Jan. 30th, 2021. In addition to the new pandemic pieces, the exhibit will include six retrospective pieces, which he produced from 2007-2019. All the pieces in the show are all connected through the artist’s iconography.

Born in Havana in 1942, Azaceta left the island in 1960 when he was a teenager . He immigrated to New York, where he graduated from The School of Visual Arts. Throughout his 40-plus year career, his works have reflected social issues including the AIDS crisis, the war in Iraq, and the migration of Cuban rafters.

His work has been displayed nationally and internationally, and he has won numerous awards from some of the most prestigious institutions.

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Carmen Herrera – Indoor and outdoor Exhibit

Carmen Herrera- exhibit indoor/ outdoor Museum of Fine Arts Houston and Buffalo Bayou Park.

“Structuring Surfaces” is at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston through January 18, 2021. Exhibit includes a 30 piece collection of her paintings, drawings, prints, wall sculptures, and objects. 

“Estructuras Monumentales” is at Buffalo Bayou Park through April 23, 2021.  The exhibition is the Houston debut of four recently completed aluminum sculptures that Herrera began in the 1960s.  

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Shifting Streams – Twelve Artists by the Hudson River

Hostos Center for the Arts & Culture, in conjunction with the Bronx Council on the Arts, will present Shifting Streams – Twelve Artists by the Hudson River in a 3D virtual space that replicates The Longwood Art Gallery @ Hostos. The exhibit brings together a group of twelve artists of Cuban origins who live and work on the west bank of the Hudson River, New Jersey where they have settled at different times of their lives and careers. The surrounding waters of their lives have shifted from the warm waves of the Caribbean Ocean to the peaceful streams of the Hudson River. Various subjects can be discerned within the variety of mediums and creative processes of these artists such as: the exploration of domestic spaces, communities, dreams, the self; anthropological revisions of material culture, history, economy, art; the aesthetics found in the principles of geometry and nature, the embodiment of cultural processes as well as the recreation of imaginative realms.

SCHEDULE AND ONLINE PUBLIC PROGRAMMING

  • Opening – Wednesday, October 7, 2020
  • Panel Discussion – Artist Public Talk Tuesday, November 10, 2020 at 5 PM
  • Closing – Wednesday, December 9, 2020

GUEST CURATOR
Meyken Barreto

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS
Jairo Alfonso
Douglas Arguelles
Kenia Arguiñao
Javier Caso
Sandra Cordero
Napoles Marty
Geandy Pavon
William Perez
Alain Pino
Pedro Valerino
Danay Vigoa
Vanessa Felnández

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NEW BEGINNINGS – CANY Online Gallery

New York, NY. Cuba Art New York (CANY), whose mission is to promote the work of Cuban American artists, is pleased to announce CANY Online Gallery and its coming inaugural online exhibit New Beginnings, Summer 2020.

After a hiatus, CANY is back with an invigorated vision and strategy. Our new endeavor, the CANY Online Gallery, comes at a time when the art community has been hit hard by the global pandemic.

New Beginnings, Summer 2020, will be on view from August 1st to August 31st at CanyOnlineGallery.org. It will showcase the work of eight talented Cuban American artists: Jairo Alfonso, Julio Antonio, Ángel Delgado, Alain Pino, Carlos Rodríguez Cárdenas, Baruj Salinas, Rubén Torres Llorca, and Pedro Vizcaíno, from different generations and with different approaches to artistic expression. They are connected not only by place of origin, culture, displacement and life experiences but by their exceptional talent. They are all powerful ambassadors of Cuban contemporary art.

New Beginnings, is the first of four annual exhibitions that CANY Online Gallery will organize every year, coinciding with the seasons. The gallery will also feature art for sale from past and future exhibits as well as donated works.

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GORY: Notes for a Retrospective, at Aluna Art Foundation, Miami

From November 21, 2015 to January 16, 2016

Opening Reception: November 21, 7:00pm

Curated by Aluna Curatorial Collective (Adriana Herrera y Willy Castellanos)

Aluna Art Foundation
1393 S.W. 1st. Street
Miami Fl. 33135

The notion that Art History is a theoretical and iconographic narrative where its construction – and deconstruction – can and should pass, given by the tension amongst the diverse modes of hegemony that captures its account, was vital for the conception of the exhibition by “Rogelio López Marín, “Gory”: Notes for a Retrospective”. As such, Aluna Curatorial Collective (Adriana Herrera y Willy Castellanos) makes a merited lengthy homage, to one of the pioneers of contemporary art in Cuba, owner of a vision that is as much personal as irreducible, and whose decisive contribution to art and photography – in the island and in the continent -, deserves to be re-dimensioned.

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